Reviewed By: Pramod Kerkar, MD, FFARCSI

About Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

Henoch-Schonlein Purpura is pathological condition characterized by inflammation and bleeding in the blood vessels of the various joints of the body, the intestines, and the renal system of the body. The primary presenting feature of a Henoch-Schonlein Purpura is the presence of a purple colored rash in the hips and the lower extremities. It may also cause abdominal pain and joint pains in various joints of the body. In some cases, the renal system also gets affected by Henoch-Schonlein Purpura as well.

There is no age barrier for Henoch-Schonlein Purpura but in most of the cases this disorder is seen in children between the ages of 2 and 6. Henoch-Schonlein Purpura is a benign condition and goes away on its own but in some cases, especially when the renal system of the body gets affected then medical intervention may be necessary to treat Henoch-Schonlein Purpura. It may be rare that the renal system gets affected by this condition; however, it is important to have a knowledge about how are the kidneys affected by Henoch-Schonlein Purpura. This article gives a brief overview of how the kidneys are affected with Henoch-Schonlein Purpura.

How Does Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Affect The Kidneys?

Literature suggests that in about 50% of children with Henoch-Schonlein Purpura the kidneys get affected. This condition is called Henoch-Schonlein Purpura nephritis. The function of the kidney is to remove all the waste material and toxins from the body. The kidneys do their job through small blood vessels called the glomeruli.

In children with Henoch-Schonlein Purpura, the immunoglobulin A gets deposited on these blood vessels causing them to get inflamed and swollen. This results in leakage of blood and proteins into the urine. Some studies suggest that Henoch-Schonlein Purpura which affects the kidneys is the reason behind development of IgA nephropathy which is a condition requiring aggressive medical intervention.

Children with Henoch-Schonlein Purpura where the kidneys get affected only have hematuria and proteins on urinalysis. Such children do not have the characteristic rash that is noted with other cases of Henoch-Schonlein Purpura.

Also Read:

Pramod Kerkar

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD,FFARCSI

Pain Assist Inc.

Last Modified On: May 18, 2018

This article does not provide medical advice. See disclaimer

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

We'll help you live each day to the healthiest