How Long Will It Take To Recover From A Parotid Tumor & How Long Does The Symptoms Last?

The incision takes nearly 6-8 weeks to heal completely, however you will take one to two years to resume your normal routine.1

Recovery time varies depending on the severity of the surgery, some patients do not face any complications after surgery nevertheless in some cases, problems with facial movements become permanent.2

The symptoms of salivary gland cancer often last depending on the specific disorder.3,4

How Long Will It Take to Recover From A Parotid Tumor?

The recovery from parotid tumor minimally invasive surgery is very fast, predictable, and uncomplicated. The incision takes nearly 6-8 weeks to heal completely, however you will take one to two years to resume your normal routine.

There are certain instructions you need to follow to recover completely from the optimal surgery. Post-surgery, you will be tired and drowsy due to anesthetics and makes you feel uncomfortable. You will get tired very easily during the entire first week, the patients may feel unwell and prefer to sleep or rest quite often. However, this is a very normal condition because your body is preparing itself for healing.1

Incision Care After Surgery- After the parotid tumor surgery, you will be on antibiotics to heal the stitches. There can be minor bruising, swelling, and hardness around the incision and this will persist for about 3 weeks. This condition will improve, and the hardness will disappear in the next 2-3 weeks.

Recovery time varies depending on the severity of the surgery, some patients do not face any complications after surgery nevertheless in some cases, problems with facial movements become permanent.2

How Long Do The Symptoms Of A Parotid Tumor Last?

In the first month after parotid tumor surgery, your healthcare provider will advise you to keep your head level raised to bring down the swelling. This may at times interrupt your sleep pattern, good sleep is often crucial for healing. If you sleep on the side of your surgery, it may not bring any harm, however, in rare cases, the patient may feel pain due to pressure applied on that side.

The symptoms of salivary gland cancer often last depending on the specific disorder.

Nausea – Patients will be given anti-nausea medicine during and after surgery. But still, you may have nausea for 8-10 hours after surgery. During such instances, try avoiding heavy meals and decrease your activity.

Discomfort- Patients may feel pain and discomfort around the incision due to muscle soreness. You may be directed for pills to avoid discomfort. This may disappear in a week after surgery.

Fever And Swelling – Fever up to 101 F and swelling around the neck are common post-surgery. When the temperature increases further, you should seek immediate medical attention. When it is stable and doesn’t worsen, the symptoms will improve in 4-5 days.3,4

The salivary gland produces saliva to keep your mouth moist and helps you to chew, taste, and swallow to aid digestion. There are three pairs of relatively large salivary glands

Parotid Gland- They are the largest of the salivary glands located just in front of the ears forming a swelling or lump like mass and making an appearance of chipmunk cheeks

Submandibular Glands- They are located beneath the floor of the mouth producing 70% of saliva in your mouth. You can feel the gland as a small lump in the upper cheek.

Sublingual Glands- They are situated under the tongue forming a shallow groove on the medial surface of the mandible.

References:

  1. “Parotid Surgery Recovery & After Care: What You Need to Know.” Parotid Tumor Surgery | Salivary Gland Surgery Los Angeles CA, 21 Apr. 2020, www.parotid.net/surgery-after-care/.
  2. “Parotidectomy After Care & General Timeline Guide: Dr. Larian.” Parotidectomy After Care & General Timeline Guide | Dr. Larian, www.parotidsurgerymd.com/education/articles/instructions-for-parotid-surgery/.
  3. “Salivary Gland Tumors.” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 30 July 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/parotid-tumor/cdc-20388269.
  4. Ho, Kimberley, et al. “An Overview of the Rare Parotid Gland Cancer.” Head & Neck Oncology, BioMed Central, 14 Sept. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3197557/.

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