Is Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome A Progressive Disease & Alternative Treatments For It?

The pathophysiology of PAES is considered to be progressive, with arterial thrombosis arising in certain people as a normal progression of the disorder procedure.1,2

Endovascular treatment with surgical de-entrapment of the popliteal artery is a probable alternative treatment for PAES.3

Combined catheter therapy that includes percutaneous transluminal thrombembolectomy, local thrombolysis, and percutaneous transluminal dilatation is a different corrective methodology to PAES.4

Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) is a rare cause of exercise-induced pain in the extremities that include leg and foot. It occurs when tendons and muscles compress the knee muscles restricting the flow of blood. This happens when you overuse your muscles during exercise or workout and produce pain, coldness in the foot, and cramping in the calf.

PAES is mostly asymptomatic however due to the progressive nature of the disease, surgical correction will be required to avoid further damage.

Is Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome A Progressive Disease?

Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome happens due to an extraneous firmness of the popliteal arteries that leads to vascular damage. It is an unusual disease that typically affects young and athletic adults who are in late teens or below 30 years of age. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are often necessary to prevent symptoms from progression.

However, a missed diagnosis will result in the progression of the disorder and necessitate the requirement of other invasive procedures. The pathophysiology of PAES is considered to be progressive, with arterial thrombosis arising in certain people as a normal progression of the disorder procedure. Acute limb ischemia triggered by embolism or thrombosis occurs when there is compression in the artery within an aneurysm.1

Medical studies show that 85% of people diagnosed with PAES are identified to be males in the age group of 16 – 30 years and most cases are accompanied by leg-induced leg-pain, cramping, and numbness in the lower leg. Experts and professionals recommend surgery for PAES patients to prevent the progression of the disorder. The progression of the disease is much slower in function popliteal artery entrapment syndrome and these patients may require surgery depending on the progression of the condition as well as the severity of the disease.2

Alternative Treatment For Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome

People seek for alternative treatment when they are not satisfied with conventional surgery or may think it may offer more personal autonomy and control over their health. Although, surgery is the most frequent option to remove the compression of the popliteal artery and repair normal blood flow there are potential alternatives in the treatment of PAES. This may include the following

Endovascular Treatment- Both endovascular techniques and surgical procedures have produced a technical success rate of 100% and were able to remove compression. Studies demonstrate that endovascular treatment with surgical de-entrapment of the popliteal artery is a probable alternative treatment for PAES. This is a less invasive procedure and offers an alternative to conventional surgical methodologies. It can restore normal blood flow to the limb and produce long-term results in patients with PAES.3

Combined Catheter Treatment- Combined catheter therapy that includes percutaneous transluminal thrombembolectomy, local thrombolysis, and percutaneous transluminal dilatation is a different corrective methodology to PAES. This procedure was performed to remove thrombotic and embolic occlusion of the popliteal artery.

Catheter treatment avoided the requirement of direct vascular surgery and implantation in PAES patients however the results are still under investigation.4

Nevertheless, in cases where the arteries are blocked, the surgeons may perform bypass in the affected area to correct the muscular issues.

References:

  1. D;, Stager A;Clement. “Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome.” Sports Medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), U.S. National Library of Medicine, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10461713/.
    Edla, Sushruth. “Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome.” Vascular Disease Management, www.vasculardiseasemanagement.com/content/popliteal-artery-entrapment-syndrome
  2. Ozkan, Ugur. “Endovascular Treatment of Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome: Technical Aspects and Results of Endovascular Treatment with Surgical Release of Popliteal Artery.” Vascular Disease Management, www.vasculardiseasemanagement.com/content/endovascular-treatment-popliteal-artery-entrapment-syndrome-technical-aspects-and-results.
  3. Edla, Sushruth. “Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome.” Vascular Disease Management, www.vasculardiseasemanagement.com/content/popliteal-artery-entrapment-syndrome

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