How Common Is A Parotid Tumor & What Is The Life Expectancy For Someone With It & Is There A Surgery For Parotid Tumor?

Salivary gland cancer is a rare type of cancer in the United States affecting 1 in 100000 adults and occurs more likely in older adults.1,2

It can occur in any people irrespective of the age and the 5-year survival rate for a specific stage of the salivary gland is 90%.3

The survival rate in people with parotid gland tumors often depends on the type, stage of cancer, and distance of its spread.4

Head and neck cancer affects more than 52,000 Americans every year and accounts for 5 percent of tumors all across the globe. More than 80% of salivary gland cancers occur in the parotid gland followed by submandibular and minor salivary glands.

Most cases are benign and slow-growing tumors and occur beneath normal skin or mucosa. For many people with salivary gland cancer, surgical incision performed by a head and neck surgeon is the main line of treatment. This surgery is referred to as parotidectomy.

How Common Is A Parotid Tumor?

Tumors arise from various cells in the salivary glands. The parotid gland is one of the largest salivary glands and can be either benign or malignant. Clinical studies demonstrate that usage of tobacco is one of the primary factors of increasing the risk of cancerous salivary gland cancer.

Salivary gland cancer is a rare type of cancer in the United States affecting 1 in 100000 adults and occurs more likely in older adults. Medical theories suggest that the likelihood of malignancy in parotid tumors is inversely proportional to the size of the tumor. In most cases, parotid tumors have only 20% malignancy whereas tumors of submandibular glands or other minor glands have 80% chances of becoming malignant. Approximately nearly 25% of parotid masses are slow-growing lesions occurring in the tuber cinereum and inferior hypothalamus and the remaining 75% are an abnormal growth of cells that multiply and split more than they should or do not die when they should.

Treating parotid gland cancers necessitates great accuracy when comes to the head and neck specialists because minor discrepancies can result in permanent paralysis of the facial nerves nearby. Paralysis of the facial nerves results in the loss of the ability of opening/close your eyes, raising your eyebrows, and smile.1,2

What Is The Life Expectancy For Someone With It & Is There A Surgery For A Parotid Tumor?

It can occur in any people irrespective of the age and the 5-year survival rate for a specific stage of the salivary gland is 90%. The stage of salivary gland tumors has the greatest impact on prognosis and survival. For instance, if the 5-year survival rate for a specific type of parotid gland tumor is 90%, the chances of people of not having that type of cancer will also have a 90% chance of 5-year survival rate after diagnosis.3

The survival rate in people with parotid gland tumors often depends on the type, stage of cancer, and distance of its spread.

The American cancer institute relies on information on the seer database. This tracks the 5-year survival rate based on stages and group cancer into

  1. Localized – It is found in tissue and organ that can be completely removed by surgery
  2. Regional – The tumor grows large and has spread to different parts of the body and nearby structures and lymph nodes
  3. Distant – cancer has spread to distant organs and lymph nodes such as lungs.4

References:

  1. Schiff, Bradley A., et al. “Salivary Gland Tumors – Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders.” Merck Manuals Professional Edition, Merck Manuals, www.merckmanuals.com/professional/ear,-nose,-and-throat-disorders/tumors-of-the-head-and-neck/salivary-gland-tumors.
  2. “Parotidectomy (Parotid Gland Tumor Surgery).” Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/types/salivary-gland/salivary-gland-cancer-treatment/parotidectomy-parotid-gland-tumor-surgery.
  3. Croce, A, et al. “Parotid Surgery in Patients over Seventy-Five Years Old.” Acta Otorhinolaryngologica Italica : Organo Ufficiale Della Societa Italiana Di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Pacini Editore SpA, Oct. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2689531/.
  4. “Prognosis and Survival for Salivary Gland Cancer – Canadian Cancer Soc.” Www.cancer.ca, www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/salivary-gland/prognosis-and-survival/?region=on.

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