Can You Die From Parotid Tumor & How Do You Stop It From Spreading?

Based on Medical studies conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, the report shows that most people die within 3 years.1,2

Taking plenty of fluids helps in the production of saliva and plays a bigger role in the prevention of infections in your mouth and throat.3

Preventing salivary gland tumor is hard because the exact cause of the condition is not known. However, the condition that has spread to distant parts of the body can be controlled by chemotherapy.4

Can You Die From A Parotid Tumor?

The survival rate of the parotid tumor is 5-year from the time of diagnosis. A medical study was conducted by salivary gland specialists who had experience for over 20 years on more than 50 patients during 1995 and 2014. Based on Medical studies conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, the report shows that most people die within 3 years.

The investigation was based on a cohort study in a multihospital institution comprised of 75 participants with a mean age of 66 years. The study shows that most cases of cancers were noticed in the parotid glands and a small percentage of cases were noticed in sub-mandibular and sublingual glands.

There were overall 41% cases reporting carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (a high-grade salivary gland carcinoma arising from a primary or recurrent benign pleomorphic adenoma) The histological feature of this condition included the invasion of cancer to the space surrounding a nerve, spread around the lymph node, ERBB2 ( a protein-coding gene that produces abnormal growth of cells making an excess of HER2 protein due to a gene mutation) and vascular invasion.

Facial nerve involvement showed a worse prognosis and the recurrence after 5 years was rare. It occurs predominantly on the parotid gland, the largest of the salivary glands, and the overall survival rate was less than 40% for stage 1 and 23% for stage 4 condition.1,2

How Do You Stop Parotid Tumor From Spreading?

There are hundreds of types of salivary gland tumors and cancer can start anywhere in the body. Saliva glands play a vital part in producing saliva to keep the mouth moist and prevent dehydration. Taking plenty of fluids helps in the production of saliva and prevent infections in your mouth and throat.3

Salivary infections can spread deep into the tissues of the head and neck and perhaps this is a life-threatening condition that can result in mortality. Hydration in conjunction with intravenous antibiotics is very helpful in controlling the spread and prevent the infection from propagating to the deep tissues of the head and neck and the bloodstream.

Preventing salivary gland tumor is hard because the exact cause of the condition is not known. However, the condition that has spread to distant parts of the body can be controlled by chemotherapy.4

Salivary gland cancer is a sporadic, destructive malignancy of the salivary gland. Since this is a sporadic disorder, clinical studies were limited for a smaller number of people. The survival rate of the parotid tumor is often dependent on several factors such as the patient’s history, type, and stage of cancer, treatment, and level of fitness.

There are no major statistics that show the parotid gland survival by stage. When you experience a well-defined mass in the parotid gland, the head and neck specialist will perform a biopsy to determine whether the abnormal growth is cancerous or not to identify a treatment plan.

References:

  1. “Salivary Gland Cancer.” Survival | Salivary Gland Cancer | Cancer Research UK, 26 Nov. 2019, www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/salivary-gland-cancer/survival.
  2. “Beastie Boy’s Death: What Is Salivary Gland Cancer?” CNN, Cable News Network, 4 May 2012, thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2012/05/04/beastie-boys-death-what-is-salivary-gland-cancer/
  3. “Benign Salivary Gland Tumors.” Stanford Health Care (SHC) – Stanford Medical Center, 12 Sept. 2017, stanfordhealthcare.org/medical-conditions/cancer/salivary-gland-cancer/salivary-gland-cancer-types/benign-salivary-gland-tumors.html
  4. “Salivary Gland Infection (Sialadenitis).” Salivary Gland Infection (Sialadenitis) | Johns Hopkins Medicine, www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/salivary-gland-infection-sialadenitis.

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