Can You Feel A Paraganglioma & Coping Methods For It?

Paraganglioma appears as an expanding and pulsing mass as a simply isolated lesion causing very few symptoms.1

Individuals suffering from paraganglioma can experience symptoms such as high blood pressure, sweating, or heart palpitations.2

For several reasons, individuals do not experience the similar side effects even when they are given the identical therapy for the same form of malignancy, so coping methods can be based on physical side effects, emotional side effects, and financial side effects.3,4

Can You Feel A Paraganglioma?

Paraganglioma appears as an expanding and pulsing mass as a simply isolated lesion causing very few symptoms. Individuals affected with this condition can experience the following warning signs and symptoms.

These symptoms occur when the abnormal cells causing the tumor releases excess hormones in the bloodstream transmitted to the different organs of the body. As a result of which, some individuals will feel symptoms even several times a day wherein some experiences weekly or monthly. The effects can last from a few seconds to several days.1

Individuals suffering from paraganglioma can experience symptoms such as high blood pressure, sweating, or heart palpitations. High blood pressure is the most typical symptom of paraganglioma that is hard to control and fluctuates widely. However, clinical studies state that not all experiencing high blood pressure can have this condition.

The symptoms vary depending on the location of the tumor. When the tumor originates on the neck, the individual can experience pain, hoarseness, fatigue, and difficulty in swallowing. Similarly, when the person is affected by Jugular paragangliomas, it affects the cranial nerve causing nerve paralysis and numbness on the face.2

Coping Methods For Paragangliomas?

For several reasons, individuals do not experience the similar side effects even when they are given the identical therapy for the same form of malignancy, so coping methods can be based on physical side effects, emotional side effects, and financial side effects.

Coping With Physical Side Effects- Cancer and cancer treatment offer a wide variety of side effects so the healthcare team can advise about ways to reduce the side effects to make you feel better. Some side effects can last until the treatment ends and some can last for months and years after the treatment ends.

Coping With Emotional And Social Side Effects- When you impacted emotionally express your feeling to some you trust, it can be your loved one, your friend, or the healthcare team. You can explore more on the conditions and find ways to get relaxations from the symptoms.

Coping With Financial Effects- Treatment for this cancer tends to be an expensive option. To cope with your financial burden, you need to change your lifestyle and medical care.3, 4

A paraganglioma is an uncommon form of cancer that originates in certain nerve cells and spread to the distant parts of the body. The condition can affect people irrespective of age however there are increased changes between the ages of 30 and 50.

Paraganglioma is slow-growing cancer and is usually tends to be non-cancerous (benign). However, it can spread to the other parts of the body and becomes cancerous. In most cases of paraganglioma tumors, the abnormal cells produce catecholamines a hormone that induces blood pressure, irregular heart rhythm, and tremors.

References:

  1. Hornbeek, Heidi, et al. “Functional Vagal Paraganglioma: a Case Report Illustrating Diagnosis and Management.” Skull Base: Official Journal of North American Skull Base Society … [Et Al.], Thieme Medical Publishers, Nov. 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3134809/.

  2. “Paragangliomas – Treatment, Types & Symptoms.” Mount Sinai Health System, www.mountsinai.org/locations/cerebrovascular-center/conditions/tumors/paragangliomas.

  3. Offergeld, Christian, et al. “Head and Neck Paragangliomas: Clinical and Molecular Genetic Classification.” Clinics (Sao Paulo, Brazil), Hospital Das Clínicas Da Faculdade De Medicina Da Universidade De São Paulo, 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3328838/.

  4. van Hulsteijn, L. T., et al. “Avoiding and Nonexpressing: Coping Styles of Patients With Paragangliomas.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 1 Sept. 2013, academic.oup.com/jcem/article/98/9/3608/2833093.

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