Recovering/Coping at Home for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

Painkiller might be necessary during the first few days due to the kneecap dislocation or patellar dislocation, like ibuprofen or paracetamol. Follow the instruction regarding dosage on the packet.

Exercises for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

If the pain is not controlled, see your general physician (GP) a fracture might have occurred, so an X-ray might be needed if one has not been done already. It may be necessary for your physician to prescribe a painkiller like codeine which is stronger.

Keeping the splint should only be for exercise that are supervised by a physiotherapist and for comfort and when you have regained full control of the leg, it should be removed. This will pave way for muscle strengthening which stabilizes the kneecap.

Some exercise should be given to you by a physiotherapist, like raising your leg straight, for you to do at home to improve the movement of the knee and strengthen the muscles of the leg. If you are currently managing the recurring dislocation, you will not need supervised treatment.

Recovery from a kneecap that is dislocated lasts up to six weeks.

Preventing the Recurrence of Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

Dislocation will occur once again when one had a dislocation when they were kids. The healing process of the muscles that surrounds the joint will determine the chances of recurrent dislocation. Obese individuals are at a higher risk since muscle control demands extra strength in order to control movements of the kneecap, also if a patient has hyper mobile joints. Regular exercise as recommended by you physiotherapist will guarantee better chances of prevent kneecap dislocation.

Exercises for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

Patients having this condition are commonly prescribed to use the following exercise. Before you embark on the exercise there is need to talk about it with your orthopaedic or physiotherapist to ascertain its suitability. They should not elevate the symptoms at and should be done trice every day.

Advice should be for the physiotherapist on the appropriate time on when to initially begin the exercise and progressing to the intermediate eventually, advanced finally other exercise. Provided the symptoms are not increased, additional exercise should be started.

  1. Static Quadriceps Contraction Exercises for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

    Static Quadriceps Contraction Exercises for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

    Push the knee down into a towel so as to tighten your front thigh muscles (quadriceps) (the figure below). Fill the tightening of the muscle by putting the fingers on the inner quadriceps. Repeat the process 10 times after holding for five seconds without elevating the symptoms.

  2. Supine or Adductor Squeeze Exercise for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

    Supine or Adductor Squeeze Exercise for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

    Lay on your back when starting the exercise as shown, fixing a Pilates ball in the middles of the knees (below figure). Straighten the knees so as to tighten the thigh muscles (quadriceps) and then squeezing slowly the ball between the knees so as to tighten the inner thigh muscle (adductors). Repeat this ten times while holding for 5 second each round as hard as possible and comfortably provided there is no pain.

  3. Bending Knee Exercise for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

    Bending Knee Exercise for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

    Straighten and bend the knee to an extend that you can do without pain and so long as you are feeling not more than just a mild moderate and moderate stretch (below figure). So long as the exercise is free of pain you can increase movement gradually as tolerated. As long as there are no symptoms, repeat it 10-15 times.

  4. Hip Extension in Standing Exercise for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

    Hip Extension in Standing Exercise for Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

    Stand at a bench or table in order to balance when beginning this exercise. Keep the knee and you back straight and take the leg backwards slowly, tighten your gluteals (bottom muscles). Hold it for 2 seconds and return to the initial point you started slowly. Repeat it two times so long as it is free from pain.

Prevention of Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

Kneecap dislocation or patellar dislocation can be prevented by:

  • Avoid falls by taking precautions. Get eye check up on a regular basis and if you are under medication, consult your doctor on the potential of the medicine to make you dizzy. Remove tripping hazards around your home and ensure it is well lit from your pathways.
  • When playing contact sports, wear all the protective gear recommended for the sport.
  • Avoid recurrence. You are more susceptible to dislocate again if you have had a dislocation before. Stability and strength exercise, as per your doctor's recommendation should be done to avoid recurrence and to improve support for the joint.
  • Apply protective technique during exercise or while engaged in a sport. Keep the knee flexible and strong.
  • Kneecap dislocation or patellar dislocation may not be preventable in some cases, particularly if physical factors increase your vulnerability to dislocate the knee.

Famous Footballers with Kneecap Dislocation or Patellar Dislocation

The following are few famous football/ basketball players from America & UK who had kneecap dislocation or patellar dislocation:

  • English footballer Britt Assombalonga
  • American basketball player, Joel Przybilla
  • American basketball player Moses Malone
  • NBA basketball player Shaun Livingstone
  • Marcus Lattimore, American footballer
  • Gabe Carimi, USA footballer
  • English footballer, Shaun Barker.

Also Read:

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD, FFARCSI

Last Modified On: May 3, 2016

Pain Assist Inc.

Pramod Kerkar
  Note: Information provided is not a substitute for physician, hospital or any form of medical care. Examination and Investigation is necessary for correct diagnosis.

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