Reviewed By: Pramod Kerkar, MD, FFARCSI

Understanding the Siddhasana or the Accomplished Pose!

Siddhasana or the accomplished pose is an asana used for meditation and other yogic practices.

The name Siddhasana is derived from Sanskrit where "Siddha" means "power" or "perfection" and "Asana" means "Pose" or "Posture".

The word Siddhi is derived from Siddha and refers to a psychic power developed through yogic practices. Siddhis include many powers. Siddhasana, or Siddha yoni asana for women, is believed to be the asana that helps develop these powers.

It is said that Siddhasana is one of the best of all the yogasanas for meditation. It is said that practice of Siddhasana purifies all the nadis or energy channels in the body and by eating moderately and practicing Siddhasana for 12 years anyone can attain success in yoga. Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose seated yoga posture that is traditionally used for long periods of meditation and breathing exercises.

Even people with big thighs can practice this Asana easily. In fact, this is better to some persons than Padmasana. Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose should not be practiced by females. There is another asana called the Siddha Yoni Asana which can be practiced by females.

Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose improves the flexibility of your hips, knees, and ankles, and strengthens the back. It will provide benefits for your mind, body, and spirit.

How to Do Siddhasana or the Accomplished Pose?

How to Do Siddhasana or the Accomplished Pose?

  • Sit with the legs outstretched straight in front of the body on the floor or on the yoga mat.
  • Bend the right leg and place the sole of the foot flat against the inner left thigh with the heel pressing the perineum to get into Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • Perineum is the area midway between the genitals and the anus.
  • Make sure that you are sitting on top of the right heel while getting into Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • Adjust the body until it is comfortable and the pressure of the heel is firmly applied while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • Bend the left leg and place the left ankle directly over the right ankle so that the ankle bones are touching and the heels are one above the other while practicing The Accomplished pose.
  • Press the pubis with the left heel directly above the genitals.
  • The genitals will, therefore, lie between the two heels while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • If this is too uncomfortable for you to get in, you can simply place the left heel as near as possible to the pubis while practicing Siddhasana pose.
  • While practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose, push the toes and the outer edge of the left foot into the space between the right calf and thigh muscles.
  • This space may be enlarged slightly by using the hands or temporarily adjusting the position of the right leg if need while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • Get hold of the right toes and pull them up into the space between the left calf and thigh while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • Again adjust the body so that it is comfortable.
  • The legs should now be locked, with the knees touching the ground and the left heel directly above the right heel.
  • Make sure that your spine is erect while practicing Siddhasana.
  • Place the hands on the knees in jnana, chin or Chinmaya Mudra while in the final Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • Close the eyes and relax the whole body in the final pose.
  • Stay in Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose for as long as you are comfortable.
  • Beginners can stay in the pose for a few minutes and then get back to sit in Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • To release the pose, outstretch the legs straight on the floor or on the yoga mat.
  • When you feel normal, you can get back in Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose again.

Breathing Pattern to Be Followed While Practicing Siddhasana or the Accomplished Pose

  • Inhale deeply while folding the legs and taking them towards the perineum while getting in to Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • Maintain a constant breath while you are in Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose. Keep inhaling and exhaling deeply while being in it.
  • Exhale deeply once or twice after releasing Siddhasana.

Preparatory and Follow Up Poses to Be Practiced With Siddhasana or the Accomplished Pose

  • Preparatory Poses: The various preparatory poses to be practiced before Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose are Dandasana or The Staff Pose.
  • Follow Up Poses: The various follow-up poses or Pranayamas to be practiced after Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose are Anulom Vilom or The Alternate Nostril Breathing, Kapalbhati Pranayama, Vajrasana or The Diamond pose, Uttanasana or The Standing Forward Bend Pose, Balasana or The Child Pose and Dhanurasana or The Bow Pose.

Benefits of Practicing Siddhasana or the Accomplished Pose

  • Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose direct the energy from the lower psychic centers upward through the spine.
  • It helps in stimulating the brain and calming the entire nervous system.
  • Siddhasana stretches the hips, knees, and ankles.
  • The Accomplished pose strengthens the core muscles, including the abdomen and the back.
  • With regular practice of Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose, the pressure applied to the perineum regulates the production of hormones, particularly testosterone, and can be therapeutic for men with prostate troubles.
  • The position of the lower foot at the perineum presses Muladhara chakra, stimulating moola bandha, and the pressure applied to the pubic bone presses the trigger point for adhisthana, automatically activating vajroli/sahajoli mudra.
  • Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose redirects blood circulation to the lower spine
  • It massages the abdominal organs and stimulates the digestive organs thereby improving digestion.
  • The Accomplished pose tones the lumbar region of the spine and the pelvis.
  • Siddhasana also helps I balancing the blood pressure in people suffering from high blood pressure.
  • Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose helps in balancing the mind, increases the power of concentration, and induces physical and mental relaxation quickly. The thinking process becomes very clear and precise with regular practice of Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • It refreshes and rejuvenates you and also relieves you of stress and mild depression.
  • Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose helps in increasing flexibility during difficult situations.
  • With regular practice, Siddhasana helps in relieving constipation.

Precautions and Contraindications While Practicing Siddhasana or the Accomplished Pose

  • People with any injury in the knee or have had any recent knee surgery should not practice Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • People suffering from back ailments like sciatica should also not practice Siddhasana.
  • The Accomplished pose should not be practiced by those with sacral infections.
  • People with slipped disc problem should practice Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose very carefully.
  • You can use cushions to make yourself comfortable while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • Do not practice Siddhasana pose if you do not feel comfortable during the practice.
  • Do not over do The Accomplished pose if you feel pain in your body.
  • Start the practice mildly and then increase the repetitions as per your capacity.
  • If you have any doubts about your condition, consult a physician before practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose and always practice asana under the supervision of a trained yoga expert.
  • Do not over exert yourself while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose. Do not push yourself beyond the limits. Go only as far as your body allows.

Tips While Practicing Siddhasana or the Accomplished Pose

  • Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose may be performed with either leg on the top.
  • You might experience discomfort due to the pressure applied where the ankles cross each other. Place a folded cloth or piece of sponge between the legs at this point while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • For the beginners, the pressure applied at the perineum may be uncomfortable to hold while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose, but with constant and consistent practice you will get comfortable in the pose.
  • Make sure that you hold the spine upright while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • Concentrate on the eye center and try to equalize the weight on the right and left the side of the body while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.
  • While holding The Accomplished pose, place the hands on the knees in Chin or Jnana mudra to derive maximum benefits from the asana.
  • You can experiment with various heights of support to find the most appropriate position for you to hold Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose for a longer duration.
  • You can also sit with your back against a wall for the back support initially while practicing Siddhasana or The Accomplished pose.

Siddhasana or the Accomplished Pose Variations

  1. Guptasana or the Hidden Pose

    • The left heel is placed over the perineum.
    • The right heel is outside the left heel.
    • The two ankles are in close apposition or contact.
    • The right toes are held inside the hollow between the left thigh and left calf muscles while practicing Guptasana or The Hidden Pose.
    • The left toes are covered by the right leg. Since this Asana hides the perineum; it is called Guptasana or The Hidden Pose.
  2. Vajrasana or the Adamantine Pose

    • To practice Vajrasana or The Adamantine Pose, the left heel is placed below the perineum.
    • The right heel is placed over the perineum.
  3. Baddhayonyasana

    • Sit in Siddhasana and do Yoni Mudra.
    • It is called Baddhayonyasana.
  4. Kshemasana

    • By sitting on Siddhasana if you raise your hands together up to your chest level, it is called Kshemasana.
Pramod Kerkar

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD,FFARCSI

Pain Assist Inc.

Last Modified On: February 13, 2018

This article does not provide medical advice. See disclaimer

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