Can You Have Back Pain With Interstitial Cystitis & Does IC Cause Fatigue?

When IC muscles are severely overworked or strained, you can feel pain in the back or side with feverish, shivery feeling.1,2

Symptoms of interstitial cystitis typically include pain in the perineum, urethra, lower abdomen, and lower back.3

Medical studies demonstrate that chronic fatigue is noticed in a lot of IC patients.4

Interstitial cystitis is a chronic bladder condition affecting 4 to 12 million people in the United States alone. It is a tricky condition, tough syndrome hard to diagnose because it is often misjudged for urinary tract infection.

There are several treatments for IC that make help improve the symptoms although there is no proven cure for this disorder. As IC shows a wide range of symptoms and severity, researchers think it may be associated with several diseases however when your pain lasts more than 6 weeks and the pain is not related to other infections or kidney stone, then you have higher possibilities of IC.

Can You Have Back Pain With Interstitial Cystitis?

Interstitial cystitis is a painful condition and can bring in a lot of challenges to your daily routines. It has the potential to severely impact your career, physical activities, and sexual life. But what is IC?

IC in a nutshell is a severe bladder problem causing bladder pressure, bladder pain, and in rare cases pelvic pain as well. Your bladder is a hollow muscular organ that stores urine when it is full, it urges you to urinate. However, when you have IC, you experience pressure and pain when the urine starts filling the bladder and you feel the need to urinate most often

When IC muscles are severely overworked or strained, you can feel pain in the back or side with feverish, shivery feeling. IC shows a huge variation in symptoms and may vary from person to person. Some patients get resolved with symptoms fairly quickly roughly around 3-14 days, but some may linger with these problems for weeks or months.1,2

Symptoms of interstitial cystitis typically include pain in the perineum, urethra, lower abdomen, and lower back. The pain can range from a dull to severe aching pain. When you pass urine, you may experience a mild sting, or it can be seriously burning.

A study was conducted on eight patients who were diagnosed with bladder pain syndromes or females who reported interstitial cystitis. Clinical tests highlighted that these patients had a connection to lower back pain. The pain occurs when sacral nerves irritated by a disc bulge and can result in bladder issues.3

Does Interstitial Cystitis Cause Fatigue?

Many PBS/IC patients have major trouble with fatigue and exhaustion. The exhaustion can be due to varied reasons. It could be as a result of constant walking to pee and bladder stress throughout the night. When your sleep pattern is disturbed it leads to fatigue, depression, and leaves you irritated.

Interstitial cystitis can produce pain, stinging sensation when you pee. The IC patients feel pain in the lower abdomen, have reduced quality of life that leaves you sick and tired. Medical studies demonstrate that chronic fatigue is noticed in a lot of IC patients.

Medical studies reveal that a small subset of IC patients have chronic fatigue syndrome and women are at a higher risk irrespective of age, race, and ethnicity. This form of fatigue is not of the usual fatigue that individual experience after a busy day or stressful events. This is perhaps disabling fatigue that is not improved with rest.4

References:

  1. “Interstitial Cystitis (IC): Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment.” WebMD, WebMD, 29 Oct. 2019, www.webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/interstitial-cystitis.
  2. NHS Choices, NHS, www.nhs.uk/conditions/kidney-infection/.
  3. Cashley, Mark A P, and Marie A Cashley. “Chiropractic Care of Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome Associated with Pelvic Lumbar Spine Dysfunction: a Case Series.” Journal of Chiropractic Medicine, Elsevier, Dec. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3706703/.
  4. Harvard Health Publishing. “Diagnosing and Treating Interstitial Cystitis.” Harvard Health, www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/diagnosing-and-treating-interstitial-cystitis.

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