Reviewed By: Pramod Kerkar, MD, FFARCSI

Congestive heart failure is essentially a stage where there is a presence of a lot of fluid buildup around the heart which inhibits the heart to pump efficiently. It is a chronic condition which progresses over time. Congestive heart failure can be fatal because the proper blood circulation throughout the body gets gravely hampered and thus fluid and blood starts accumulating in the abdomen, lungs, liver and lower torso. Medical attention in this case is an absolute necessity.

What are the Final Stages Of Congestive Heart Failure?

What are the Stages Of Congestive Heart Failure?

Congestive heart failure has few stages and with each stage the progression continues. The stages include-

Class I- Here the patient gets diagnosed with heart failure. If medical treatment is started in the very initial stage, the progression can be controlled. Patients can do any kind of physical activity without any limitations.

Class II- Patients are seen to have slight but limited physical capacity. It is seen that when patients get involved in increased activity, he gets fatigued and have severe chest pain along with palpitations. Once rest is taken the patient gets back his strength.

Class III- Patients are seen to be easily fatigued. Patients experience chest pain along with palpitations. Even normal activities make them tired. However, if appropriate rest is followed they regain their strength.

Class IV- This is the final stage of congestive heart failure. Patients are seen to be completely unable to do any form of activity. They have a discomfort and frequently complain of chest pain. Severe pain is experienced in the chest if any kind of physical activity is undertaken.

What are the Final Stages Of Congestive Heart Failure?

The final stage of congestive heart failure is characterized by complete inactivity and severe chest pain with fatigue.

  • With increase of progression in the final state the general prognosis starts to deteriorate.
  • The illness becomes more severe as the patient becomes unable to carry out almost any physical activity.
  • Various bodily functional impairments start and progress over time as the patient complains of severe chest pain.
  • Severe shortness of breath in patients is readily noticed.

The patient has to stay in bed during the final stage of the heart failure and has to be completely dependent on a caregiver.

What are the Risk Factors Of Congestive Heart Failure?

Congestive heart failure primarily originates from problems with cardiovascular system of the body. Thus, it gets extremely important to go for regular routine checkups to ensure proper functioning of the heart and its valves. The risk factors include-

Hypertension: Increased blood pressure may lead to congestive heart failure. Hypertension is one of the chief causes of increased blood pressure.

Artery Blockage: Blockages in the arteries can lead to congestive heart failure. These blockages occur due to accumulation of fat and cholesterol in the blood vessels. Thus increased cholesterol content in the blood is a risk factor. Such blockages inhibit proper blood from the blood vessels thereby damaging them.

Heart Valve Conditions: This brings to the next risk factor which is the heart valve condition. Heart valves are extremely important as they carry blood to and fro from the heart to the organs in the body. In case these valves are damaged due to leak or blockage, the circulation gets affected. In turn the human heart pumps the blood harder which can lead to heart infection.

Diabetes: There are other factors which can lead to congestive heart failure. They include diabetes, obesity or even any form of severe allergic reaction or infection. Congestive heart failure can be a deadly disease if proper medical assistance is not sought in the right time. It is a progressive disease which makes the patient completely bed-ridden with acute chest pain due to accumulation of fluid in the body. The heart fails to pump blood effectively, essential for sustenance.

Also Read:

Pramod Kerkar

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD,FFARCSI

Pain Assist Inc.

Last Modified On: October 20, 2018

This article does not provide medical advice. See disclaimer

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