How Often Does Spontaneous Pneumothorax Happen?

The incidence of spontaneous pneumothorax may be underestimated as 10% of patients with spontaneous pneumothorax are asymptomatic and others with mild symptoms may not present to a doctor for treatment. The incidences mentioned below are from the patients that presented to a medical provider, but there might have been more cases of spontaneous pneumothorax.

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Spontaneous pneumothorax is the presence of air in the pleural space. Spontaneous pneumothorax is subcategorized into two groups

  1. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP)
  2. Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP)

The incidence rate of spontaneous pneumothorax in United Kingdom was estimated at 24.0/100 000 years in men and 9.8/100 000 years in women.

Annual hospital stay for spontaneous pneumothorax in France estimated at 22.7 per 100,000 (considering a French population of 65.7 million); Male to female ratio been 3.3:1. The study also revealed there was no significant monthly or seasonal variation of distribution.

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Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is defined as the spontaneously occurring of air in the pleural space in patients without any clinically apparent underlying lung disease.

Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) occurs commonly in people aged 20-30 years, with a peak incidence in the early 20 years. The age-adjusted incidence of PSP is 7.4-18 cases per 100,000 persons per year in men and 1.2-6 cases per 100,000 persons per year for women. The male-to-female ratio of age-adjusted rates is 6.2:1. PSP is rarely seen in people older than 40 years (European respiratory review). France study revealed PSP was more common in younger males than in younger females (the mean age of women presenting with PSP was high)

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Risk Factors for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax (PSP)

Smoking - 80-90% of PSP cases occur in smokers or former smokers, and the relative risk of PSP increases as the number of cigarettes smoked per day increases.

Tall, Thin Stature In A Healthy Person – exact reason is unknown. The reason may be height affects development of subpleural blebs or whether more negative apical pleural pressures causes preexisting blebs to rupture.

Marfan Syndrome – connective tissue disorder

Pregnancy – the reason in not clear

Familial Pneumothorax – can be due to the familial connective tissue disorders

Secondary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) is defined as spontaneous occurring of air in the pleural space in patients with underlying lung disease. SSP is more common in elderly people and the peak incidence is seen in people age 60-65 years. The age-adjusted rate of SSP is 6.3 cases per 100,000 persons per year for men and 2.0 cases per 100,000 persons per year for women. The male-to-female ratio of age-adjusted rates is 3.2:1 (European respiratory review). French study also revealed SSP was more frequent in men than in women.

Diseases associated with secondary spontaneous pneumothorax are:

Summary

The incidence rate of spontaneous pneumothorax in United Kingdom was estimated at 24.0/100 000 years in men and 9.8/100 000 years in women. Annual hospital stay for spontaneous pneumothorax in France estimated at 22.7 per 100,000 (considering a French population of 65.7 million); Male to female ratio been 3.3:1. The study also revealed there was no significant monthly or seasonal variation of distribution. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) occurs commonly in people aged 20-30 years, with a peak incidence in the early 20 years. The age-adjusted incidence of PSP is 7.4-18 cases per 100,000 persons per year in men and 1.2-6 cases per 100,000 persons per year for women. The male-to-female ratio of age-adjusted rates is 6.2:1. PSP is rarely seen in people older than 40 years. SSP is more common in elderly people and the peak incidence is seen in people age 60-65 years. The age-adjusted rate of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax is 6.3 cases per 100,000 persons per year for men and 2.0 cases per 100,000 persons per year for women. The male-to-female ratio of age-adjusted rates is 3.2:1

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Pramod Kerkar

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD,FFARCSI

Pain Assist Inc.

Last Modified On: October 10, 2018

This article does not provide medical advice. See disclaimer

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