What is Subchorionic Bleeding & How is it Treated? | Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis of Subchorionic Bleeding

What is Subchorionic Bleeding?

Any type of bleeding during pregnancy tends to be quite worrisome for the mother as well as the family. This is because pregnancy does not cause any vaginal bleeding. Physicians state that some form of bleeding does occur during pregnancy in almost 50% of pregnancy cases. While this may be benign in many cases, there are instances where it tends to be serious. Subchorionic Bleeding occurs when there is accumulation of blood between the uterus and the gestational membranes when the female is pregnant. It is quite a common cause of bleeding during pregnancy. It generally occurs during the first and the second trimester.[1]

A study conducted on approximately 60,000 females showed that around 2% of females experienced Subchorionic Bleeding during their pregnancy. While in majority of the cases, Subchorionic Bleeding is benign and poses no threat to the pregnancy, there have been some observations made by physicians of some complications that at times may occur due to Subchorionic Bleeding. There are also certain other reasons as to why bleeding occurs during pregnancy. These causes include intercourse during pregnancy, infections, or any changes in the cervix.[1]

What is Subchorionic Bleeding?

What Causes Subchorionic Bleeding?

With regard to Subchorionic Bleeding, there has been no cause identified as of now and research is still going on as to why it occurs in some and not in others. Subchorionic Bleeding at times tends to create blood clots between the uterus and the gestational membranes. These are called as Subchorionic hematomas. This may at times cause vaginal bleeding.[2]

What are the Symptoms of Subchorionic Bleeding?

Aside from vaginal bleeding, some of the other symptoms that can be seen as a result of Subchorionic Bleeding include pain around the pelvis and cramping. In some cases, Subchorionic hematoma is observed only on ultrasound.[2]

How is Subchorionic Bleeding Diagnosed?

It is essential for any pregnant female to consult with a gynecologist in case she experiences vaginal bleeding. To come to a diagnosis, the physician will perform a detailed physical examination and blood tests will be ordered. The physician may also order an ultrasound examination to look for any abnormalities.

The ultrasound will give a clear image of the fetus and any abnormalities can be visualized through the ultrasound. In cases of Subchorionic Bleeding, a clear area of blood will be seen within the uterus on ultrasound which will confirm the diagnosis.[1]

How is Subchorionic Bleeding Treated?

Subchorionic Bleeding in majority of the cases does not require any treatment. The physician will recommend plenty of rest and advise to abstain from sexual activity till the time the baby is delivered. In most cases, Subchorionic hematoma resolves by itself and the bleeding stops. Till that time, the patient will be monitored regularly by the physician to ensure that no untoward complications develop which may pose a threat to the health of the female as well as the fetus.[1]

With regard to prognosis, Subchorionic Bleeding is quite common in females during the first and the second trimester of pregnancy. However, it is still recommended to consult with a physician to identify any other causes that may be behind vaginal bleeding during pregnancy. Other than that, Subchorionic Bleeding is a completely benign condition with extremely rare instances of complications that can be taken care of by the physician during routine checkups.[1]

References:

Was this article helpful?

Yes No
×

Suggestions to Improve the Article

This article contains incorrect information.

This article does not have the information I am looking for.


I Have a Medical Question.

Ask A Doctor Now

If you are facing a medical emergency, call your local emergency services immediately, or visit the nearest ER or urgent care facility
×

Suggestions to Improve the Article

×

How Did This Article Help?

This Article Did Change My Life!


I Have a Medical Question.

Ask A Doctor Now

If you are facing a medical emergency, call your local emergency services immediately, or visit the nearest ER or urgent care facility
×

Thank you for your feedback.