Physiotherapy for Fractured Tibial Plateau or Tibial Plateau Fractures

The aim of physiotherapy after a fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fractures is to help you heal soon. Many objectives that are small are throughout the recovery period in the specific exercise to be performed. Changing of exercise over time is the objective. Muscle mass gain, improved motor control, adhesions preventions, body and knee stabilisation gains and improvement are some of the advantages and objectives owed to physiotherapy and more.

Physiotherapy and Recovery for Fractured Tibial Plateau

Physiotherapy can be started a couple of days after surgery for fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fracture. Starting early and being in touch with a qualified physiotherapist from the start is is very important.

Home is where the first exercise for fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fracturewill be performed; later a centre for rehabilitation, a local gym is a place where you can be referred to later for further exercise. Performance of several exercises in some cases is done but it is not mandatory at all. Pain can occur while performing the exercise that is uncomfortable or it can be painful slightly, but it must not hurt much. Doing tasks gently and slowing down should be your consideration if the pain you are in, is serious. Avoid doing exercise under painkillers that are heavy (the unlikely of this is high in during the first couple of weeks) as this will mean that you are straining your leg excessively. Consider pain as your friend helping you to realize when something is wrong (it will prove to be the enemy unfortunately).

The objective of physiotherapy exercise for fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fractures is mainly:

  • Knee Stability: More stable movement will be contributed by strengthening smaller muscles that supports the knee as the knee is bending and bearing weight in the near future.
  • Motion Range: The formation of adhesion after surgery will make the knee loss ROM later. The aim of the exercise is to constantly increase the ROM (Return of motion) with gentle bending and going further in every week. It is unlikely to regain 100% motion range unfortunately, but early and constant exercise, good results can be yielded at a range of motion which is almost full.
  • Motor Control: Regaining motor control that is good in the leg muscle and the knee is the focus of some exercises.
  • Muscle Mass Gain: Losing your leg muscle mass takes only a second but regaining takes forever. The focus of much exercise is to regain muscle mass in the smaller and the main muscles of your leg.

Recovery for Fractured Tibial Plateau or Tibial Plateau Fractures

Early Motion Exercises for Fractured Tibial Plateau or Tibial Plateau Fractures

Your physician will have to decide the best moment of moving your knee so as to prevent stiffness. The state of the soft tissues (muscle and skin) in the recovery process, and the security of the fracture after fixing it, will be the determiner.

Passive exercise is the beginning of early motion: the knee will be moved by a physical therapist (PT) gently, or the knee can be put under a passive motion machine which is continuous which moves and cradles the leg.

The bone is weak if it was fractured in many pieces, fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fracture healing will take longer, and recommendation of motion activities by your doctor may take longer.

Weight Bearing Suggestions for Fractured Tibial Plateau or Tibial Plateau Fractures

You must follow the instruction of the doctor regarding putting weight on the injured leg, for you to avoid problems with fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fractures.

Until fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fracture healing has occurred, your doctor will be against the idea of bearing weight on the knee that is injured regardless if surgery was done or not. Up to 3 months might be required for full healing to be realized allowing for full weight bearing. Walker or crutches will be required during this time. For additional support you can wear a brace for the knee.

X-rays will be regularly scheduled by your doctor to check on the healing progress of the fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fracture. If your fracture was treated with a cast or brace, your doctor will see the changing position of the leg through the X-ray. On determination that the fracture is not posing a risk of repositioning by the doctor, more weight can be put on the leg. Walker and crutches might still be needed despite the fact you can put more weight on the leg.

Rehabilitation for Fractured Tibial Plateau or Tibial Plateau Fractures

You will normally feel unsteady, stiff and weak when you can put more weight on the leg during the recovery period of fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fracture. Share your concerns with the physical therapist (PT) and doctor despite this expectation. You will possibly regain more function with the right designed rehabilitation plan.

You will be guided by you physical therapist (PT) through the rehabilitation process for fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fracture. The wellbeing of your recovery from fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fractures is determined by making healthy decisions and commitment to physical therapy (PT). Therapist or doctors may recommend smokers to quit. Bone will be prevented from healing according to some. Professional services to help you with quitting smoking may be recommended by your therapist or doctor.

Outcome (Prognosis) for Fractured Tibial Plateau or Tibial Plateau Fractures

There are concerns for fractured tibial plateau or tibial plateau fractures that are long-term because fractures of proximal tibia concerning joints bearing weights in active individuals. Long term arthritis and loss of knee stability and motion are the inclusions.

Your reasonable expectation, risks and personal concerns can be discussed by your doctor. The impact of these on your recreational activities, family responsibilities, work and life will have to be discussed by him or her.

Also Read:

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD, FFARCSI

Last Modified On: December 31, 2015

Pain Assist Inc.

Pramod Kerkar
  Note: Information provided is not a substitute for physician, hospital or any form of medical care. Examination and Investigation is necessary for correct diagnosis.

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