Moyamoya disease refers to a progressive and rare type of blood vessel i.e. vascular disorder, where carotid artery present in the skull becomes narrow or blocks resulting in reduction in the flow of blood to the brain. This results in the formation or opening of tiny blood vessels at the brain base region to supply blood to the brain. As the newly formed tiny blood vessels or clusters are unable to supply the required oxygen and blood to your brain, it results in permanent or temporary brain injury.

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The word Moyamoya thus implies puff of smoke as per Japanese language i.e. a terminology to describe the presence of various tiny blood vessels in cluster form. Even the condition leads to stroke, TIAs, bulge and bleeding in the brain or ballooning in blood vessels. Along with this, Moyamoya disease affects the way, in which your brain performs its functions and causes development delays or cognitive issues or disability.

How Is Moyamoya Diagnosed?

To diagnose your Moyamoya problem, your doctor will start with reviewing your symptoms, your medical history and your family history. Even your doctor conducts a physical examination followed by many tests to diagnose your disease and related underlying conditions.

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MRI i.e. Magnetic Resonance Imaging For Moyamoya

MRI test for Moyamoya uses radio waves and powerful magnets to design detailed images of the patients’ brain. For this, your doctor injects a dye in the blood vessel to view the veins and arteries, while highlight your blood circulation i.e. angiography of your magnetic resonance.

Furthermore, depending on your condition, your doctor recommends a special type of imaging, which is able to measure the exact amount of blood to pass from the blood vessels, also known as perfusion MRI.

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Cerebral Angiography For Moyamoya

While conducting a cerebral angiogram or angiography, your doctor will insert catheter i.e. a long tube into the blood vessel in the Moyamoya patient’s groin and guides the same towards his/her brain by the help of X-ray imaging patterns. Later on, your doctor injects a dye from the catheter into brain blood vessels to check the visibility of affected blood vessels under X-ray images.

CT Scan i.e. Computerized Tomography Scan For Moyamoya

CT scan type of diagnose to detect Moyamoya uses a series consisting of X-rays to create detailed images of the brain. In this case, your doctor will inject a dye in the blood vessel for highlighting the flow of blood in the veins and arteries i.e. CT angiograms.

Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound For Moyamoya

In case of transcranial Doppler ultrasound technique or simply ultrasound procedure for Moyamoya, doctors use sound waves to obtain images of the arteries and blood vessels in your brain. Doctors until now have considered ultrasound test as the best one to collect information related to blood vessels in your brain.

Combination of PET and SPECT Tests For Moyamoya

In the combination test consisting of PET and SPECT tests, your doctor injects a safe radioactive material in small amounts and places the suitable emission detectors on your brain. PET test is the acronym for Positron Emission Tomography and it is responsible to provide visual images of your brain activity. On the other side, SPECT is the abbreviated form of Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography, which is responsible to measure the flow of blood to different regions of the brain.

EEG i.e. Electroencephalography For Moyamoya

EEG test is responsible to monitor various electrical activities go on in the brain with the help of a series consists of electrodes remain attached to the scalp. Children suffering from Moyamoya disease usually exhibit abnormalities on their EEG tests.

Other Tests and Diagnose Procedures

Along with the tests and diagnose procedures, depending on your individual conditions, your doctor will recommend for various other tests and diagnose procedures.

Also Read:

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4533332/

Sheetal DeCaria MD

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

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Last Modified On: April 2, 2019

This article does not provide medical advice. See disclaimer

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