Reviewed By: Pramod Kerkar, MD, FFARCSI

Kidney stones can be formed due to many reasons. These are not the only and fixed reasons, but these are potential risk factors for causing a kidney stone.

Is Orange Juice Good for Kidney Stones?

Some foods are known to lower the kidney stones formation. But, there is no fixed type of diet to help prevent all types of kidney stones from forming. Different types of kidney stones need different type of dietary guidelines. By limiting or adding certain foods in one’s diet, one can prevent kidney stones from forming again and again.

Orange juice is one such home remedy to be considered in the diet advised for kidney stones. Orange is a citrus fruit. Many studies show that potassium citrate supplements effectively reduce the risk of formation of kidney stones again and again. However, many people are intolerant to potassium citrate supplements. They can benefit from the citrate in the orange juice, which is naturally available in oranges. When one consumes more citrate rich food, citrate is released more in the urine, thereby reducing its acidity, and potentially reducing the risk of kidney stones. Orange juice inhibits the crystal formation in the urine. Many other citrus fruits possess the same qualities, but orange juice has them in abundance. It is particularly helpful in preventing calcium oxalate and uric acid stones.

One should consume foods rich in calcium, especially if one is also consuming foods rich in oxalate. Calcium and oxalate together can bind in the intestine, effectively reducing the chances of recurrence of kidney stones.

Is Orange Juice Good For Kidney Stones?

Fruits and vegetables are to be used in abundance, as many are known to possess natural anti-stone forming properties. But, this should be done by proper consultation with a dietician, as he/she will be able to tell which foods to eat in plenty and which foods are to be totally avoided in particular types of kidney stones.

It is advisable to stop smoking altogether and reducing the quantity of alcohol consumption. These are potential risk factors in any kidney disorder.

Calcium kidney stones are formed due to excess calcium in the urine, uric acid stones are formed due to excess uric acid in the urine, such as in gout, cystine stones are caused due to excess amino acids and struvite stones are a reaction to a urinary tract infection.

Until the kidney stone stays inside the kidneys at one place, it usually does not cause any symptoms. But, once it moves and travels inside the kidney and then ureter and beyond, it may cause irritation to the walls of these organs, and as a result there can be severe pain and some bleeding in the urine. This can be accompanied with several other symptoms as well.

Those who previously suffered from kidney stones and got them treated or removed, are at a greater risk of developing kidney stones sometime again in their lives. However, if these people follow certain lifestyle changes, they may majorly cut down their risk of getting kidney stones again.

It is particularly beneficial to increase your water intake considerably. Good water intake will reduce the acidic levels of the kidneys, thereby reducing the chances of stone formation.

It is also advised to eat less food that are high in oxalate content, if one tends to get calcium oxalate stones. A diet that is low on salt should be chosen. Also, processed foods are to be avoided as they are high on sodium. A diet consisting of less animal protein is recommended, as more animal protein may make the urine acidic, thus leading to kidney stones. Calcium rich food is good to have, but one has to be careful with calcium supplements.

Conclusion

Kidney stones are an immensely painful condition and are never to be dismissed as something very trivial. Along with the proper course of treatment, if one follows the lifestyle changes mentioned above, then one can prevent kidney stones from happening frequently.

Also Read:

Pramod Kerkar

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD,FFARCSI

Pain Assist Inc.

Last Modified On: November 2, 2018

This article does not provide medical advice. See disclaimer

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