How Much Rest Is Needed After Bypass Surgery?

How Much Rest Is Needed After Bypass Surgery?

The first phase of recovery after bypass surgery requires the patient at least a minimum of 8 weeks of rest. The case holds good for those who underwent open heart surgery. The advancement in the medical field provided new techniques that are helping the surgeon is to complete the task quickly with quick recovery.

Upon discharge from the hospital, the patient receives necessary guidelines from the doctor. Following them is essential in improving the condition and maintaining good health. Improper follow up will lead to the development of infections or bleeding, resulting in an emergency or certain circumstances, death.

How Much Rest Is Needed After Bypass Surgery?

Wound Care

The surgeon makes an incision of the breastbone to expose the heart and carry out the bypass surgery. After completion, the doctor closes the incision and places the patient in intensive care unit for one or two days. After shifting to the general ward, it is crucial that the patient maintains a hygienic condition of the incision region. Keeping it clean and dry prevents the occurrence of infection.

Depending on the bypass surgery recovery progress, the patient will be in a position to take a bath. However, it is necessary to seek immediate medical assistance upon noticing the following signs:

  • Increase in drainage.
  • Redness around the cut.
  • Increased fever.
  • Edges of the incision pulling apart.

It is also crucial to speak with the doctor when a patient feels the sensation of shifting of the breastbone or feels a cracking sound during movement.

Pain Relief

It is common for the surgeon to provide prescribed medicines for bypass surgery patient before discharging. It is common for every patient to feel numbness along the incision with itchy sensation. However, it does not hurt as it did before the operation. If the surgeon utilized leg veins for grafting, then the patient will have excess pain in the legs rather than the chest. The stiffness and soreness felt by the patient will pass with time. To further ease the pain, the exercise prescribed by the rehabilitation team will be helpful.

Activity and Driving

It is necessary for the patient to build strength by participating gradually in regular activities such as household chores. Doctors recommend:

  • Not to pull or lift heavy objects.
  • Not to stand in a single place for more than 15 minutes.

Daily routine includes walking for at least 30 minutes. For those who feel difficulty in walking regularly, scheduling one hour walking for three times in a week is preferable. Walking helps in improving the blood flow along with improvement in breathing. Until the doctor tells the patient to climb the stairs, it is preferable to keep away from the same.

Additionally, it is crucial to attend to the consultation at the prescribed intervals, as it helps the doctor understand the progress. The surgeon can also recommend a few diagnostic tests to monitor the activity. Depending on it, the doctor will also let us know whether it is okay for the patient to drive a vehicle. If the patient underwent minimally invasive surgery, it is probable that the patient can drive a vehicle sooner.

Diet

Depending on the bypass surgery, underlying health problems, and post-operation observation, the doctor will let you know about changes to the diet. Usually, the doctor refers to a dietician who changes the choices to ensure that the body receives appropriate nutrients, fats, proteins, and vitamins. A proper diet is essential for speeding up the healing process.

It is difficult for any patient to consume food within the first few days after the surgery. Therefore, the diet includes smaller meals and fluids, which fulfills the requirement of essential nutrients.

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