In this article you will read about the treatment for congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip, non surgical treatment options and surgery options, risk factors and complications in congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip.

Congenital Hip Dislocation or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

Treatment for Congenital Hip Dislocation or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

Treatment Summary for Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

If during the diagnosis of congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip, your child is below six months of age, pavlik harness is what is likely to be fitted with. The hip joint is pressed by the harness into the sockets. The frog like position of the hip is secured by the harness. The severity of the condition and the age of the baby determine the time of wearing the harness usually 6 to 12 weeks. The harness might be needed by your baby in part time or fulltime basis.

If the baby is too big to wear the harness for congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip or the pavlik harness treatment is not successful, surgery for congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip might be needed. General anesthesia is used in the surgery, which might be maneuvering the hip to the socket, known as closed reduction, or lengthening the tendons and removal of barriers prior to fixing the hip, called open reduction. After positioning the hips of your baby, the legs and hips, for 12 weeks, will be in casts.

If the response to treatment by a child of 18 months is negative, pelvic or femoral osteotomies might be needed for the reconstruction of the hip. This entails reshaping and dividing the femoral head by the surgeon, this s the hip joint's ball or the hip socket called acetabulum of the pelvis.

Nonsurgical Treatment for Congenital Hip Dislocation or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

The age of the child determines the treatment mode for congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip.

Treatment for Newborn Babies with Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

Your baby will be put in a device called the pavlik harness for congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip by keeping the thighbone in the socket for a period of 1-2 months. The brace is specially designed for holding the hip in a proper position while the legs can move easily and easy for diaper care. The formation of the hip socket is enhanced and the tightening of the ligaments surrounding the hip joint, by the use of pavlik harness.

The effectiveness of the harness is mainly ensured by the parents. Performance of the daily care jobs like feeding, dressing, and diapering will be elaborated by the healthcare team and the doctor.

Congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip is treated by placing the baby in pavlik harness for a period of 1-2 months.

Treatment for Babies With Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Who are 1 month to 6 months Old

A harness or a device like it is used in repositioning the socket in the thighbone of the baby just like in newborn treatment for congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip. This method has been a success even when hips were dislocated initially.

The duration of harnessing will vary in babies with congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip. The minimum time to be worn fulltime is 6 weeks followed by a 6 week part-time.

Closed reduction procedure is sometimes required. The thighbone of your baby will be moved by the doctor into the proper position, and a body cast applied (Spica cast) for holding the bones in position. The procedure is performed amid the baby being in anesthesia.

Specific instructions must be observed when caring for a baby who is in Spica cast. Healthcare and doctors shall teach you on identification of problem, cast maintenance, and performance of daily activities.

Treatment for Babies With Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Who are 6 months to 2 year

Spica casting and closed reduction are used for treating older babies with congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip. Before reposition the thighbone, there is the use of skin traction for a couple of weeks in most cases. The soft tissues surrounding the hip are prepared in readiness of the change of the position of the bone. It can be perfumed at the hospital or at home.

Surgery for Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

Surgeries for Babies with Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Who are 6 months to 2 years

If the thighbone is not put back successfully through a closed reduction, it is necessary for open surgery for congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip. An incision allowing the surgeon to view the soft tissues and the bones is made. In some instances, there is the shortening of the thighbone for proper fixation of the bone to the socket. Confirmation of the position of the bones is made through X-rays. Maintenance of the child's proper hip position is assured by placing him/ her in a Spica cast.

Surgery for a Baby with Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Who is Older than 2 Years

With growth and activeness of the child with congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip, the looseness worsens. Realigning the hip will typically need surgery. The hip is maintained in the socket by a Spica cast.

Complications in the Surgery for Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

Delayed walking maybe experienced by babies treated by a Spica cast for congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip. Normal walking developments will continue normally after the removal of the cast.

The positioning device and the pavlik harness might cause the irritation of the skin surrounding the straps and varied lengths of the les might subsist. It is rare to have problems with the growth of the upper thighbone; nevertheless, it can occur owing to disturbance of the supply of blood to the area for growth in the thighbone.

Persistent of a shallow hip socket is eminent even following a proper treatment for congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip, which may necessitate surgery in early childhood for the restoration of the normal hip joint anatomy.

Risk Factors for Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

The most affected sex is girls compared to boys. Nevertheless all infants are prone to developing congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip. This is the reason why during the first year of every newborn there must be a continued examination of the hips of the child during checkups in case of signs of congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip.

Complications in Congenital Hip Dislocation (CHD) or Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

Skin irritation may accrue due to splint devices in congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip. Regardless of the appropriate treatment, the lengths of the legs might still vary.

If the congenital hip dislocation (CHD) or developmental dysplasia of the hip is not treated arthritis and deterioration of the hip will occur which is so enervating.

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Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD, FFARCSI

Last Modified On: June 16, 2016

Pain Assist Inc.

Pramod Kerkar
  Note: Information provided is not a substitute for physician, hospital or any form of medical care. Examination and Investigation is necessary for correct diagnosis.

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