Can Morton’s Neuroma Cause Leg Pain?

Can Morton’s Neuroma Cause Leg Pain?

Morton’s neuroma may cause leg pain in some individuals because of strain. Morton’s neuroma is also known as interdigital neuroma or forefoot neuroma or intermetatarsal neuroma. It is a benign (non-cancerous condition) swelling at the ball of the foot due to a nerve swelling that occurs in a nerve that brings sensation to your foot. This commonly occur between the 3rd and 4th toes of your foot. The ligaments and bones put pressure on the nerve swelling, which causes inflammation and irritation in that area giving rise to pain, tingling sensation, and numbness at the ball of the foot causing irritation in your foot.

As, we mentioned above Morton’s neuroma is commonly seen between the 3rd and 4th toes, it can occur in the 2nd and 3rd toes as well and the other areas are very rare. Its seen more commonly in middle aged women, it is shown that Morton’s neuroma is seen 4-15 times more in women. It usually occurs in one foot at a time and rarely seen in both the feet at the same time, but 2 Morton’s neuromas can be seen in the same foot commonly.

Risk Factors For Morton’s Neuroma

The exact cause is unknown however; the following risk factors are known to be associated with Morton’s neuroma. This helps us to understand why it’s more common in females.

High Heels. Wearing high heel shoes and shoes with a narrow front causes more pressure on your toes and on the ball of your foot. Especially, high heeled court shoes are quite narrow in the front and this can change the shape of the bones to an abnormal shape.

Some Sports. Certain sports involving high-impact athletic activities like jogging and running can cause receptive high pressure and trauma to your feet. Sports such as snow skiing and rock climbing needs tight shoes to be worn during the activity which may put extra pressure on your toes.

Overweight/obesity

Foot Deformities. Certain foot deformities can out you at risk of getting Morton’s neuroma

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Flatfeet
  • High arch feet

Symptoms Of Morton’s Neuroma

A pain in the ball of the foot is seen. Sharp, burning, severe pain felt in the ball of the foot, radiating towards the adjacent toes, the pain occurs after walking for a short period. Pain is relieved by having rest, removing the footwear and by massaging the area. The pain worsens with time.

Some patients feel a dull pain rather than an acute sharp pain and this pain is quite commonly felt between the 3rd and 4th toes.

Lump which is felt from outside is not usually present.

Other symptoms.

Numbness – in the affected area.

Pins and needle feeling – tingling and prickling sensation are felt over the affected area.

Sensation of something inside the foot – many patients complain that they feel as if something is inside the ball of the foot. The pain coming inside of the foot and radiating towards the toes.

Initially the symptoms occur when you wear high-heeled, covered and narrow shoes or if you are engaging in sports that increase the pressure in your foot. The symptoms might be present continuously for days or even weeks. With time the pain initiates when you start walking in flat shoes or in slippers. It comes to a point where you will be scared even to keep your foot down on the ground.

Conclusion

Morton’s neuroma is a benign swelling at the ball of the foot due to a nerve swelling that occurs in a nerve that brings sensation to your foot. It is commonly seen between the 3rd and 4th toes, it can. occur in the 2nd and 3rd toes as well and the other areas are very rare. Its seen more commonly in middle aged women, it is shown that Morton’s neuroma is seen 4-15 times more in women. Pain is the main symptoms and it is a sharp, burning, severe pain felt in the ball of the foot, radiating towards the adjacent toes, the pain occurs after walking for a short period. Pain is relieved by having rest, removing the footwear and by massaging the area. The pain worsens over time.

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