What is Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID)?

Systemic exertion intolerance disease or SEID is a complicated disease characterized by unexplained, persistent and relapsing fatigue in the patient. Systemic exertion intolerance disease or SEID is commonly known as chronic fatigue syndrome, this condition has several symptoms.1

There are various ways to diagnose systemic exertion intolerance disease. However, it usually is a difficult condition to diagnose as there is lack of objective clinical and laboratory findings linked with Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). There are also reduced treatment options for this condition; however certain treatment ways along with exercise helps in treating the symptoms associated with systemic exertion intolerance disease or SEID. But again, there are also some limitations with exercise, hence it is important to know the tips on exercising for people experiencing this condition.

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Let us know how exercise helps in Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease, limitations of exercising with the condition and tips for exercising with Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease or SEID.

Symptoms of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID)

Few of the major symptoms of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease or SEID include the following:

  • Reduction or impairment in ability to carry out the general regular activities, accompanied by profound fatigue 2
  • Unrefreshing sleep is one of the commonest symptoms of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease.
  • Worsening of symptoms after physical, cognitive or emotional effort or post-exertional malaise
  • Orthostatic intolerance or if the symptoms get worsen on standing upright and improves on lying down
  • Cognitive impairment may be noted as a symptom of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease, in some.

Diagnosis of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID)

We mentioned earlier that diagnosis of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease can be complex or difficult in most cases. There are some criteria that keep importance while diagnosing the condition. We will discuss about the criteria that helps in diagnosis for the condition of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease.

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1st Criteria: The person must suffer from serious chronic fatigue for at least 6 months or longer with other known medical conditions excluded by clinical diagnosis.

2nd Criteria: As per the second criteria, the person must be experiencing 4 or more of the symptoms (like sore throat, muscle pain, impairment in short-term memory or concentration, new types of headaches, multi-joint pain without swelling or redness and unrefreshing sleep) occurring at the same time or after the severe chronic fatigue phase in the condition.

Now, coming to the diagnosis of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease or SEID; here below are some of the lab findings that help us know about the condition:

  • Very low ESR or erythrocyte sedimentation rate
  • Reduced number of natural killer cells
  • Normal CBC, liver function tests and normal urinalysis
  • Elevated immunoglobulins against Coxsackie B virus, HHV-6 or Human herpes virus strain 6, etc.

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Treatment of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID)

Now let us talk about the treatment of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease; which primary includes the cognitive behavioral therapy and graded exercise therapy. In cognitive behavioral therapy, a series of one hour sessions are designed to alter benefits and behaviors that might delay recovery. This has been effective in the patients with Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease. This reduces the symptoms of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease in an effective way and promotes healing. Even graded exercise therapy has similar benefits in reducing the symptoms of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease.

It is important to know about how exercise is linked with the treatment of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease.

How Can Exercise Help in SEID or Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease?

Because of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease; most of the times there is a reduced activity. This results in a lower fitness level, including lower levels of endurance, strength and flexibility. Regular exercises based on individual tolerance level can prevent further deconditioning and enable you to maintain your strength, energy and flexibility for normal activities.

Being as active as you can, with gradual exercising you can contribute to your cardiovascular health, brain health, emotional wellness and also improve your sense of well-being. This would help you improve your overall quality of life.

Tips For Exercising With Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease

While exercises are important for Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease, it is also important to understand the ways in which it can be done safely. Let us know some tips for exercising with Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease.

However, traditional exercise program of cardio and strength training is not necessarily appropriate for people with Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease because of the nature of this disease. Usually patients with Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease or SEID cannot even tolerate high or moderate levels of physical activities and often exacerbate symptoms.

But, the good news is that one can find a level of activity that suits the individual after talking to your physician and fitness expert to plan an exercise program. You can generally start with gentle stretching, go for light walking and other low level activities depending on your symptoms and fitness level; while keeping self in SEID.

  • It is advisable to seek medical opinion and proceed with Here are some tips for exercising with Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease.
  • Get evaluated for any joint problems, imbalances in muscle strength etc. It is better to address these issues before beginning an exercise program to reduce the risk of injury.
  • Start slow and go slow with exercises. It is better to do less that you think you can do than doing more and exerting yourself.
  • Maintain an exercise and symptom log so as to discover what kinds and how much exercise you are able to tolerate without triggering a relapse or without worsening your symptoms.
  • Gradually try to increase the duration of exercise and not the intensity.
  • Start resistance bands, tubing or weight machines with light workloads if you want to go for strength exercises. Ideally, holding each contraction for 3-5 seconds each, for 3-6 repetitions and strength training 3 times a week as per your ability is recommended. It is essential to work with a certified fitness professional for a program tailored to your needs.
  • You may start with normal activities like getting out of bed, taking care of your personal hygiene, once you feel better; make sure you rest before your symptoms in Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease or SEID get worse.
  • Try a 2 minutes of walk at an easy pace at first. Rest for at least 3 times as long as you exercise.
  • You can go for the same exercise the next day if you do not find symptoms getting worse.
  • Gentle stretching exercise aids in maintaining a normal range of motion around your joints. You can stretch to the point of tension and hold for 10-60 seconds as per your ability. Repeat the stretch for 2 more times if you are able to do so. Go for stretching exercise 2-3 times in a week or even more if possible as long as you are not worsening your symptoms of Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease.

Conclusion:

It is very much true that exercise really matters in our life; and it matters more if you are living with Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease. It may be difficult at times to get through, but getting started with exercise and being known to your exercising level, you can go real great with exercise in a persistent manner. You must know the right physical activity or exercises that can help you feel better and perform your daily activities effectively, even with Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease or SEID condition. Seek medical advice and professional help.

References:  

Also Read:

Pramod Kerkar

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD,FFARCSI

Pain Assist Inc.

Last Modified On: August 8, 2019

This article does not provide medical advice. See disclaimer

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