Does Numbness From MS Go Away?

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease characterized by damage of the protective layer (myelin sheath) of the nerve fibers of the brain and spinal cord. In this condition, the immune system of the body considers healthy nerve tissues as foreign intruders and destroys them. It involves the brain, spinal cord and other nerve fibers of the body. It results in improper or faulty flow of impulses or signals from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body. It results in the symptoms like numbness, weakness, burning sensation, tingling, sometimes pain and many more.

Does Numbness From MS Go Away?

Multiple Sclerosis is a chronic neurological disease characterized by damage to the protective layer of the nerve fibers (myelin sheath). It affects nerves of the brain, spinal cord or any nerve of the body. It can be mild to disabling in its manifestation. It is an autoimmune disease that attacks its own myelin sheath of the nerve tissue. It is assumed that viral infection may trigger such attacks. It develops in the people of the age of 20- 40 years.

Initially, multiple sclerosis affects eyes and causes double vision, color distortion, or blindness in the eyes. Then, it affects muscles of various parts as the signals or impulses traveling from the brain and spinal cord to muscles get distorted resulting in symptoms like tingling, burning, muscle spasms and numbness in the affected part.

Numbness is a typical symptom of MS. It is also the most common symptom of MS also. It is not similar to other motor symptoms and does not cause too severe disabilities. It is a sensation of falling asleep in the extremities. It is a chronic symptom of MS. It can appear in arms, hands, legs or feet. It may represent problems depending upon on the part it has involved. In feet, it may cause disturbance of coordination and balance. In hands, it may lead to problems related to writing, moving an object and holding an object with hands. Numbness in genitalia can cause sexual dysfunction. These sensations become worse at night that may disturb sleep and may increase the intensity of the symptoms.

The numbness in MS is usually without pain. It causes discomfort in the affected areas. Such groups of sensory symptoms are called paresthesia. The symptoms of paraesthesia include sensations of pins, needles, burning, tickling, pricking, itching, buzzing, vibrating or throbbing in the affected area.

When such a condition is associated with pain, then the sensory symptoms of numbness are dysesthesia. When the numbness become so severe that the affected person experiences a symptom even with the slighest trigger such as a touch of clothes. This condition is known as allodynia. For example, the patient ofMS may feel pain even with the touch of clothes he is wearing or when he has got a friendly touch from some else on the affected part. Every individual with MS has a different set of sensory symptoms in MS.

In the course of time, people with MS may lose any type of sensation in the affected area. This condition is called anesthesia. It may lead to various disabilities in the aligned areas and requires treatment.

MS can relapse again and it has a remission period. Sensory symptoms have a tendency to relapse. They tend to end in a short time or remain for a long time. In the remission period, numbness may go away. However, it may return back once the remission period is over. In some cases, numbness is mild and cause slight discomfort. In certain cases, it may cause pain and annoying discomfort disturbing, an individual’s normal routine and functions.

Conclusion

The most common symptom of multiple sclerosis is numbness. The numbness is caused due to interruption of signals from the brain and spinal cord to the involved part which leads to abnormal sensations or loss of sensations. Numbness may disappear in the remission period of MS.

Also Read:

References

https://www.verywellhealth.com/numbness-tingling-multiple-sclerosis-ms-symptoms-2440806

https://mymsaa.org/ms-information/symptoms/numbness/

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