What is Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC?

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC is an unusual condition of human heart muscle. It is an inherited condition, which implies that it is passed on through families. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC is caused by a change or transformation in one or more genes. The odds of acquiring arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC might vary from person to person, and you may acquire the transformation yet not develop the condition.

In many cases, having arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC does not influence an individuals' lifespan or quality of life. In some cases, people with this condition might encounter noteworthy symptoms and could be at danger of sudden cardiovascular demise/death. It is vital that families affected with this condition receive an accurate diagnosis, assessment, treatment and support, from experts in a facility for inherited heart conditions.

What is Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC?

How Does Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy Affect the Heart Muscle?

In normal cases, where the people have normal hearts, the cells of the heart muscle are held together by proteins. It is suspected that, in individuals with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC, these proteins have not grown legitimately. Subsequently, the proteins cannot keep the heart muscle cells together under anxiety. For example, when the heart is pulsating quicker or working harder than normal, for instance during exercising. The cells become isolated and even die. The damaged and dead heart muscle cells get to be sinewy and cause scarring. Fatty deposits develop, trying to repair the harm. The condition is typically dynamic which implies that it will deteriorate with time.

The treatment for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC aims to control the symptoms. As a result of these progressions to the structure of the heart muscle, the walls of the ventricle turn out to be thin and extended, which implies that the heart cannot pump viably. The changes of the heart muscle cells can lead to the hindrance in the passage of electrical impulses which pass through the heart and can cause severe arrhythmias (heart rhythms which are abnormal) and in some cases can even cause sudden cardiovascular demise.

Causes of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

The cause of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC is genetic. We are all unique because every one of us has our own particular genetic information that makes us different. Our genes make us who we are and for instance, how tall we will be or what hair color we will have, etc... This hereditary data is held in our DNA in the cells of our body. It is produced by a coding arrangement of proteins, demonstrated by letters that tells the majority of the cells in our bodies what their capacity would be. In the event that there is a mix-up in one of these codes, the cells will accomplish something else or will not develop in the way they should be. In individuals with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC, there is a mistake in the grouping of letters that are expected to frame the proteins that hold the heart muscle cells together.

This "error" is known as a genetic mutation. The transformation is present from birth, yet the progressions to the heart muscle rarely happen before pre-adulthood.

How Does Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathyor ARVC Affect Pregnancy and Childbirth?

In most of the cases, pregnancy is safe for those women who have arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC. But in some of the cases, pregnant women with any heart condition, carries an extra risk and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC adds more to the risk. This is because the pregnancy increases the workload of the heart. In case you know you have arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC, you might be worried about taking medications and want to know its effect on your baby. Before planning a family, you need to discuss all these concerns with your doctor, before you conceive a baby.

Severe morning sickness amid pregnancy can prompt dehydration and chemical imbalance, which also increase the risk of arrhythmias (heart rhythms which are abnormal). It can also diminish the adequacy of any medicine that you are taking to control your indications. If your indications of morning sickness are extreme, you ought to see your specialist immediately.

If you are considering having an epidural amid your labour, you ought to examine this with your specialist in the early stages of your pregnancy, as an epidural can cause a critical fall in circulatory strain. For a few ladies, becoming pregnant produces indications of cardiomyopathy surprisingly. This might be troublesome for you to manage, however your obstetrician will work carefully with your cardiologist to take care of you and your child.

Signs and Symptoms of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

Some individuals with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC do not experience any signs and symptoms and some of them get those symptoms but never have any severe problem related to their condition. It depends on how the sickness advances in the individual and whether the condition influences one or both ventricles.

Individuals with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC may experience one or more of the below mentioned signs and symptoms:

  1. Heart Palpitations are a Symptom of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    This is a sensation of an additional or skipped pulse. At times, palpitations may begin all of a sudden and feel quick, and might be joined by sweating or dizziness. Heart palpitations are a major symptom of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

  2. Light Headedness or Wooziness is a Symptom of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    Light headedness is a symptom of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC. This may happen when you are working out, or after palpitations, or infrequently for no obvious reason. It might feel as though you are passing out, or that your head is spinning.

  3. Fainting or Swooning is a Sign of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    Fainting is a sign of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC. This is the point at which you lose consciousness. This is regularly explained as passing out, being 'out for a few moments', having a blackout or fainting.

  4. Swelling of the Abdomen, Legs or Ankles is a Symptom of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    Swelling of the abdomen, legs or ankles could demonstrate that the pumping activity of your heart is poor. This can happen because the right ventricle cannot pump blood to the lungs legitimately. This is once in a while known as right-sided heart failure. This is a symptom of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC. It can also happen if the left ventricle cannot pump blood out. Your specialist will do some tests to discover how your heart is influenced.

  5. Dyspnoea or Shortness of Breath is a Symptom of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    A minority of patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC get short of breath when they are being physically dynamic. This is ordinarily caused by damage to the left ventricle or in light of the fact that the individual has an arrhythmia. Most of the people just feel a little restricted by their shortness of breath. In some cases, people might feel more restricted in the level of activity they can take, and very often some individuals might be short of breath while they are resting.

    Arrhythmia may cause any of the above symptoms, which frequently happens amid strenuous movement. Chest pain, sweating, breathlessness and nausea may also accompany the arrhythmia. These indications should be explored. If the person loses consciousness, he should be taken immediately to the hospital.

    In the event that your heart muscle is extremely influenced and the pumping activity of your heart is fundamentally lessened, your specialist may let you know that you have heart failure.

  6. Arrhythmias are a Symptom of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    The anomaly of the heart muscle in individuals with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC can sometimes meddle with the ordinary electrical action of the heart. The electrical impulse can be disrupted while passing the damaged areas or scarred areas of the heart. This can prompt moderate, quick or erratic heart rhythms known as arrhythmias. Arrhythmias are quite common with those having arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC.

  7. VPB or Ventricular Premature Beating is a Symptom of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    VPB is also known as the ventricular ectopics or the premature ventricular contractions (PVC). VPB happens when an electrical impulse begins in one of the ventricles. The ventricles react by contracting before the ordinary motivation from the atria touches base at the ventricles, which makes the sentiment an additional pulse. Individuals with VPB may encounter a consciousness of the heart pulsating out of rhythm or shuddering, known as palpitation.

    VPB are not normally hazardous and are generally regular in health individuals. They can happen due to basic things like drinking excess of espresso, smoking, absence of rest, anxiety or drinking liquor. However, VPB may also be an indication of a basic heart condition, especially in the event that they happen unpredictably or if there are heaps of them. VP or ventricular premature beating is a symptom of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC.

  8. VT or Ventricular Tachycardia is also a Symptom of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    VT happens when you have a series of VPB or ventricular premature beating in fast progression. The beats can happen in short blasts, or they may last more than 30 seconds. Ventricular tachycardia can deliver a vacillating feeling in the chest, or a vibe of your heart thumping out of rhythm. You may feel as though you are going to black out, or may feel tipsy or bleary eyed. This is known as pre-syncope.

    VT or ventricular tachycardia is a severe type of arrhythmia. It can bring about a sudden fall in circulatory strain and may bring about loss of cognizance known as syncope. The patients of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC experience he symptoms of ventricular tachycardia.

  9. VF or Ventricular Fibrillation is a Sign of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    Ventricular fibrillation is an arrhythmia of life threatening type and requires urgent hospital treatment. It happens when the electrical impulses of the heart turn out to be totally muddled, creating the ventricles to shudder or fibrillate. When this happens, the heart cannot pump the blood out of the ventricles, and the heart quits thumping. You can also call it a cardiac arrest. In the event that a man/woman endures a cardiac arrest, brief revival and defibrillation treatment may help the heart to come back to a normal rhythm and avert sudden cardiovascular death.

  10. AF or Atrial Fibrillation is a Symptom of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    In atrial fibrillation, the atria (which are the 2 upper chambers of human heart) beats sporadically and quick. This can prompt sentiments of palpitations or vacillating in the chest. This may happen just at times, or it might be there constantly. AF is not generally life-debilitating, but when the atria do not contract normally, this expands the danger of a coagulation framing in the atria, which can some of the time lead to a stroke. Atrial fibrillation is a symptom of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC.

Tests to Diagnose Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

Tests conducted to diagnose arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC are hard, because the changes to the heart muscle are regularly extremely minor or develop in an "inconsistent" pattern. A hefty portion of the progressions and manifestations could also be brought on by various different conditions, making conclusion much more troublesome.

Below are some of the tests conducted to diagnose arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC:

  1. Medicinal History of the Patient with Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    Your doctor will need to know about your medical history and will ask you a lot of questions about it. They will also get some information about your family, including your folks and even about your grandparents. They may inquire as to whether you have ever had indications, for example, palpitations or blackouts, or if there were any unexpected deaths in the family, like any bed deaths. In the event that there is a background of unexpected heart demise, any coroner's or pathologist's reports that you may have could be useful.

  2. Medicinal Examination and Tests to Diagnose Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    Most of the people with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC do not have any obvious physical indications of the condition. The doctor will take your pulse to evaluate for any anomalous heart rhythms and will get some information about how you feel when you are physically dynamic. He or she will likewise inquire as to whether you have ever had any manifestations, for example, unforeseen dizziness or swooning.

    The specialist will do an electrocardiogram to take a gander at the electrical cadence of your heart. You will likewise need to go to a healing facility for a chest X-ray, and an echocardiogram to take a gander at the size and state of your heart. You may require further tests to see whether your heart muscle is affected. Also, you may need different tests to quantify how well you can work out.

  3. ECG Tests to Diagnose Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    Electrocardiogram is the most essential test for the patients suffering from arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC. It includes taping electrical leads onto your legs, arms and chest and taking readings of the electrical activity of your heart. These are printed out onto paper for the specialist to analyze.

    Signal-averaged ECG is a unique sort of ECG which identifies certain electrical signs in the heart that are some of the time created by individuals with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC.

  4. Exercise ECG Tests to Diagnose Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    Exercise ECG test for patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC is the same as the ECG portrayed above, however is recorded before, amid and after a timeframe spent practicing on a treadmill or an exercising bicycle. This permits the specialist to look at any adjustments in the electrical patterns that happen with activity, and investigate any anomalies. In individuals with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC, strenuous action can trigger irregular heart rhythms. It is imperative for your specialist to know whether this transpires, so they can treat any strange rhythms that they discover.

  5. Holter Observing Tests to Diagnose Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    Holter observing tests to diagnose arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC includes utilizing a computerized recording gadget as a part of the state of a pager. One can easily wear the gadget around their waist on a belt. The gadget can easily record the pulse of your heart for 24-48 hours, or up to a week. The specialist can then investigate the electrical action and mood of your heart to see whether you have any arrhythmias, for example, atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia.

  6. Implantable Loop Recorder or ILR Tests to Diagnose Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    ILR or implantable loop recorder for diagnosing arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC is a little gadget which is embedded, normally under the left collarbone, and can stay set up for a while. You are given a hand-held gadget which you squeeze when you feel any side effects, for example, wooziness or syncope or in the event that you feel palpitations. When you press the gadget, it stores the data about your heart mood. You should go to healing center as a day case to have the gadget embedded.

  7. Echocardiogram or Echo Tests to Diagnose Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy or ARVC

    Echo test to diagnose arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC utilizes ultrasound waves to take a gander at the structure of the heart. It creates a photo of the heart and permits specialists to quantify the heart muscle and distinguish any strange regions. Specifically, the specialists will take a gander at how the heart muscle divider moves, whether there is any diminishing of or lumps in the muscle wall, or if the walls of the ventricles have ended up extended. Extra gear, called Doppler ultrasound, can deliver a shading picture of blood stream inside the heart and give data on how well the heart is functioning.

    Some of the other tests for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or ARVC are: X-ray, CT Scans are also conducted.

Also Read:

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD, FFARCSI

Last Modified On: May 27, 2016

Pain Assist Inc.

Pramod Kerkar
  Note: Information provided is not a substitute for physician, hospital or any form of medical care. Examination and Investigation is necessary for correct diagnosis.

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