What Drugs Can Cause Parkinson’s Disease?

Physiologically, Parkinson’s disease is caused due to low levels of dopamine secretion in the body. Thus, any medication that blocks the level of dopamine in the body and cause Parkinson’s symptoms. Dopamine is a brain chemical that essentially helps control movement of a person. The various drugs include-

Antipsychotic Drugs- Parkinson symptoms are seen to be common in patients who are prescribed antipsychotic drugs. Parkinsonism as a side effect of chlorpromazine is quite common. Typical antipsychotic drugs include chlorpromazine, promazine, haloperidol, perphenazine, fluphenazine and pimozide. Dopamine receptors are widely distributed in the brain and typical antipsychotics may affect dopamine receptors in the striatum.

GI Motility Drugs- GI prokinetic drugs like metoclopramide, levosulpiride, clebopride, itopride and domperdone may cause side effects thereby making the patient prone to Parkinsonism.

What are the Other Forms Of Medicines That Can Cause Parkinson’s Disease?

Some of the other common medicines which can cause Parkinson’s disease may include some forms of anti-depressants, anti-nausea drugs, drugs used for the treatment of vertigo, drugs used for epilepsy and anti-arrhythmics. It should be remembered that not all drugs in these classes may cause signs of Parkinsonism. The doctor generally makes the patient aware of the side-effects before prescribing a certain form of drugs. Nevertheless, it is important from the patient’s part to ask about the side-effects of the prescribed medicines.

What is the Difference Between Drug Induced Parkinson’s Disease And Typically Occurring Parkinson’s Disease?

It has been seen that drug-induced Parkinsonism usually occur on both sides of your body while usual Parkinson’s starts from one side of the body. Apart from this, the medication-induced signs generally are seen to go away after the medicine is finished. However, it may take few months to stop, but is does stop eventually. On the contrary, the typically occurring Parkinson’s disease cannot be reversed. Another thing to be kept in mind is that medication-induced Parkinson’s disease is not progressive, unlike the typical Parkinson’s disease.

Who are at Risk Of Developing Drug Included Parkinsonism?

Some patients may be at a higher risk of developing medication-induced Parkinson

ism than others. Some of the risks include-

Women: Women are seen to be two times as much at risk of having drug inducing Parkinson’s disease than men.

AIDS Patients: People with AIDS are at a higher risk.

Family History: Patients having a family history Parkinson’s disease are at a higher risk of having drug induced Parkinsonism.

Elderly: Since elder people are usually on multiple medicines, they are at risk of having drug induced Parkinsonism.

Can Drug Induced Parkinsonism Be Prevented?

Although there is no surety in the prevention of drug-induced parkinson’s disease, but efforts may be made to check the dosage of drugs so prescribed-

Be Cautious with Antipsychotics: The patient or in some cases the caregiver should make sure that antipsychotic drugs are given at their least effective dosage.

Inform the Doctor: The doctor should be informed well before in case the patient already has symptoms of Parkinson’s disease so that they do not appear to get worse with the starting of some prescribed drugs.

Abrupt Stoppage of Medicine: It is never a wise decision to stop taking a medicine by oneself. It is important to talk to the doctor in case of any concerns.

Do Patients Die Due To Parkinson’s Disease?

Medically, Parkinson’s disease is not fatal. Nevertheless, the symptoms related to the disease are dangerous and can be a cause of death. As the patient becomes unable to balance himself and walk properly, injuries and falls are common.

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