Does Interstitial Cystitis Progressively Get Worse & Does Ibuprofen Make It Worse?

Interstitial cystitis is not contagious unlike other infectious diseases and doesn’t worsen over time.1

They don’t spread however it is a progressive condition. Most patients have varying degrees of symptoms and the development may vary from a mild to severe hemorrhage in appearance.2

The study reveals that common painkillers like ibuprofen makes the conditions worse and risks a kidney infection.3

The criteria to diagnose interstitial cystitis are controversial and it is often misdiagnosed for other infections. A wrong diagnosis is one of the leading factors of death in the United States. Although doctors are gaining awareness about IC, yet it still goes undiagnosed.

Women are at higher risk for developing IC and the average onset is 40. However, most cases go away by itself, and patients requiring treatment find relief and resume their normal life after symptoms improve.

Does Interstitial Cystitis Progressively Get Worse?

Interstitial cystitis is a puzzling bladder condition that causes discomfort or pain in the bladder and a need to urinate frequently and urgently. Most of the IC patients don’t require treatment and disappear on their own.

Studies show that around 70000 to millions of Americans are affected by this condition and most patients with IC are women. Interstitial cystitis is not contagious unlike other infectious diseases and doesn’t worsen over time. It neither spreads nor seems to worsen like bladder cancers. They don’t spread however it is a progressive condition. Most patients have varying degrees of symptoms and the development may vary from a mild to severe hemorrhage in appearance.1

Although women are the most infected by IC, reports demonstrate that the condition does not affect the fertility or health of the fetus. Clinical studies state interstitial cystitis is a progressive disease that typically arises from early to late stages. These patients tend to have infection both in their bladder and central nervous system causing urinary frequency and nocturia. The symptoms improve with appropriate therapies and medications.

However, conditions left untreated or improperly treated can get worse and bladder will contract further. When bladder shrinks/contracts more, the bladder becomes non-functional and turns horrible.2

Does Ibuprofen Make Interstitial Cystitis Worse?

One of the most common therapies for IC patients is antibiotics. They can successfully get rid of chronic urinary tract infections. Antihistamines, such as loratadine may lessen urinary stress and frequency and alleviate other warning signs. The key choice antibiotics for treatment of uncomplicated acute IC in women are Beta-lactam antibiotics.

Millions of women struggling with interstitial cystitis may be making it worse by taking ibuprofen for the signs. Oral medications such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are potential in improving the signs and symptoms of urinary tract infection however when it comes to IC, it could prolong the infection and enhance the risk of kidney infection. The study reveals that common painkillers like ibuprofen makes the conditions worse and risks a kidney infection.

A study was conducted on 181 patients who were administered ibuprofen. The clinical studies showed seven patients developed a kidney infection and five patients were hospitalized. Although antibiotics helped improve the symptoms and relieving pain, yet antibiotics produced possible side effects. Hence the doctor recommends dietary changes with drinking lots of water can help control the problem.3

References:

  1. Interstitial Cystitis – Adult Urologic Conditions and Treatments – Department of Urology – Rochester, NY – University of Rochester Medical Center, www.urmc.rochester.edu/urology/adult-patients/interstitial-cystitis.aspx.
  2. Jhang, Jia-Fong, and Hann-Chorng Kuo. “Pathomechanism of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome and Mapping the Heterogeneity of Disease.” International Neurourology Journal, Korean Continence Society, Nov. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5169097/.
  3. About the Author: Jill Osborne My Google Profile+ Jill Heidi Osborne is the president and founder of the Interstitial Cystitis Network, and My Google Profile+ Jill Heidi Osborne is the president and founder of the Interstitial Cystitis Network. “Why You Shouldn’t Load Up on NSAID’s for IC, Bladder or Pelvic Pain.” Interstitial Cystitis Network , 31 Jan. 2017, www.ic-network.com/why-you-shouldnt-load-up-on-nsaids-for-ic-bladder-or-pelvic-pain/.

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