The human body has an amazing defense mechanism which response immediately to any foreign body. A change of events releases chemicals to attack the invading microorganisms causing the disease. Histamine is a chemical and neurotransmitter which is released by white blood cells, basophils and mast cells. In response to the foreign body, histamine is released which increases the permeability of the blood capillaries. Blood and white blood cells enter the site to attack the microorganisms.

Advertisement

Why Do Mosquito Bites Itch So Bad?

Mosquitoes, in order to suck the blood without any coagulation and for lubrication releases saliva while piercing the skin. This activates the immune system releasing histamine. There will be swelling and itching along with the inflammation. Simple measures can help you eradicate mosquitoes from the home. Alternatively, antihistamines and anti-inflammatory can help you in relieve itching. The best and simple remedy is to apply cold press, which prevents the release of histamines or heat to destroy the proteins causing itching.

Advertisement

Mosquito when pierces the skin with the help of proboscis, it also lubricates the mouthparts with saliva. The saliva has anticoagulants which allow free flowing of blood while the mosquito sucks it. The proteins and anticoagulants of mosquito saliva are identified as a foreign body by the human immune system. Histamine possesses an inflammatory process and plays an important role in itching. Whenever an insect bites, local immune system comes into action. The aim of the immune system is to eliminate the foreign body. The redness and swelling are due to increased permeability of the blood which results in the accumulation of fluid. The histamine produces inflammation and also sends signals to the brain to itch. The immune system may not react intensely when the mosquito bites for the first time. After the first exposure to the mosquito saliva, the body learns the invading mechanism. The sensitization causes the release of immunoglobulin which takes charge of the immune response. The reaction to the mosquito bite remains consistent and every time the mosquito bites, the immune system reacts to it and produces swelling and itch. Children are more sensitive to mosquito bites when compared to adults.

Advertisement

Every time a mosquito bites, it may not be able to find a blood vessel to get a full blood meal. The mosquito will try a number of times unless they get a blood vessel. Once the mosquito finds the blood vessel, the saliva prevents coagulation of blood and the mosquito continues to suck the blood. Each successful bite of the mosquito consumes 0.01 to 0.001 microliters of blood. There is no defined number of attempts a mosquito bites. After a full meal, a mosquito will not bite for another 2-3 days. During this time, it releases a batch of eggs. A blood meal provides all the nutrients which are required for the production and development of eggs.

The itching of mosquito bite will be uncontrollable and scratching may worsen the itch. The mosquito bite already produces inflammation and scratching may cause further release of histamine increased the boundary of the inflamed area. The mosquito bite becomes itchier. Excess itching can result in breaking of skin and infection. The mosquito bite turns into the wound and it will be difficult to treat infected wounds.

As a precautionary measure, doctors often prescribe taking an antihistamine to reduce the pain and itching associated with mosquito bites. People who are planning trips in a mosquito-prone area can take an antihistamine. So there will not be histamine to cause swelling and itching. When a mosquito there are a number of remedies available to help control itch, cold compress and hot compress can help in constriction of the capillaries, decreasing the permeability of the blood vessels for the accumulation of fluid and blood cells, thus reducing, swelling and itching. Washing with mild soap is also a good option. Corticosteroid cream or anti-inflammatory creams can help you to relieve itching.

Also Read:

Pramod Kerkar

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD,FFARCSI

Pain Assist Inc.

Last Modified On: March 20, 2019

This article does not provide medical advice. See disclaimer

Advertisement

Sign Up for Our Newsletter

We'll help you live each day to the healthiest