Reviewed By: Pramod Kerkar, MD, FFARCSI

Kidney stones are a common urinary tract condition that can affect anyone, although men are at a greater risk than women. There are many factors that trigger the formation of kidney stones but coffee isn’t one of them. As much as coffee contains potassium, it is rich in caffeine which increases calcium levels in urine excreted. Kidney stones are formed whenever certain substances, passed through urine, increase over time and mix up forming hard solid stones in your kidneys. When the kidney stones are being passed out, they cause immense pain to the patient and cause discomfort. So, it is important that you take caution with how many cups of coffee you consume in a day. Nevertheless, it also triggers other conditions in your body such as increased blood pressure and cardiovascular problems to mention a few.

Can Coffee Cause Kidney Stones?

Can Coffee Cause Kidney Stones?

Although caffeine is a stimulant, it has disadvantages, especially when taken in excess. People suffering from kidney stones usually wonder whether they should give up coffee as a way of mending their lifestyle. A simple answer to that is no, but, you should keep an eye on the amounts of coffee you take in a day. Studies have been conducted to assess the relation between coffee and kidney formation, and luckily the results show an independent relationship. In simpler terms, coffee does not cause kidney stones, actually, it helps reduce the risk of their formation. This is because coffee contains potassium, which helps decrease the amounts of calcium excreted. Coffee is a low food source of potassium, and at least three cups a day is acceptable.

The Effect of Various Drinks and Formation of Kidney Stones

As a patient suffering from kidney stones, one important fact that you should know is that you should avoid dehydration. You should drink a lot of fluids, especially water, but be cautious with other drinks such as coffee, tea, beer, and wine. Coffee has diuretic properties which increase one’s urge to urinate frequently, which can lead to dehydration and finally, kidney stones. Excessive alcohol intake can cause dehydration, which in turn promotes the formation of kidney stone. Tea is also not a good option as it contains oxalate, which is one of the stone-forming compounds. So, if you are at a greater risk of kidney stones, you should keep off tea.

The wittiest thing to do is even if you take the above-mentioned drinks, make sure you also increase your intake of water. Furthermore, water keeps you hydrated. On the bad side, we have sugar-sweetened sodas and colas. These drinks increase the risk of kidney stones and not to mention, they are not healthy at all.

Necessary Lifestyle Changes To Get Rid Of Kidney Stones

We have established that coffee on its own does not result in the formation of kidney stones. However, the same cannot be said for any additives you take with your coffee. Some of the ingredients you add to coffee such as flavored syrup and creamers can lead to various kidney diseases. This is because they pack considerable amounts of phosphates, which are easily absorbed in the body and trigger kidney stones. In addition to that, limit yourself to three or four cups of coffee a day, and you’ll be safe. There is a number of healthy drinks you can also add to your diet to reduce the risk of kidney stones. These include orange juice, wheatgrass juice, pomegranate juice, celery juice, basil juice, and horsetail juice.

Conclusion

Coffee and formation of kidney stones have an inverse relation and appropriate amounts of coffee will not cause the formation of the stones. As a matter of fact, coffee helps reduce the risk of kidney stones. However, too much coffee is not good due to its caffeine content and diuretics property. This feature makes individuals have an urge to urinate often and can lead to dehydration if they don’t suffice coffee with plenty of water. Since coffee has been associated with other health problems, many people tend to think that it is bad for kidney stones. Contrariwise, coffee is actually good for patients with kidney stones.

Also Read:

Pramod Kerkar

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD,FFARCSI

Pain Assist Inc.

Last Modified On: September 28, 2018

This article does not provide medical advice. See disclaimer

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