Does Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Run In Families & Is It Worse Than Parkinson’s?

Medical studies demonstrate that progressive supranuclear palsy runs through the family and this is due to an autosomal pattern of inheritance.1,2

Both progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson’s tend to be present around 60 but people with PSP more likely to lean backward and fall forward.3

Although PSP and Parkinson’s causes stiffness, difficulties in movements, and lifetime impairments of motor functions yet PSP progresses more rapidly than Parkinson’s.4

Progressive supranuclear palsy is a rare brain disorder that causes chronic difficulties with walking, maintaining balance, and controlling eye muscles. The condition occurs due to the deterioration of brain cells which is responsible for controlling several vital motor functions.

The disease progresses in a timespan of 5 years and results in life-threatening challenges. Although there is no cure for PSP, the treatment aims in controlling the symptoms and improving the condition.

Does Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Run In Families?

The exact cause of progressive supranuclear palsy remains unknown however clinical theories show that the condition is caused when there is an accumulation of tau proteins resulting in the deterioration of brain cells that help you control movement and thinking.

Clusters of the MAPT proteins are often associated with other neurogenerative such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disorders. Medical studies demonstrate that progressive supranuclear palsy runs through the family and this is due to an autosomal pattern of inheritance.

However, the genetic link isn’t evident to show that progressive supranuclear palsy has inherited the condition. Most cases of PSP are very rare meaning it occurs in people who had no history of the disease in the past. Nevertheless, there are clinical theories that state some people who developed this condition have family members associated with this same disorder and had problems with Parkinson’s and loss of memory.

These cases have been reported to be caused by the mutation of the MAPT gene (which provides the instruction for the buildup of Tau proteins present in the neurons in the brain) and a few other genetic aspects. In the present scenario, there are no effective therapies to cure this condition and perhaps a few of the symptoms do not respond to treatment as well.1,2

Is Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Worse Than Parkinson’s?

PSP is not Parkinson however it is kind of Parkinson’ s disease. PSP as its name suggests begins slowly and continues to progress causing weakness and damaging certain parts of the brain structure. Both progressive supranuclear palsy and Parkinson’s tend to be present around 60 but people with PSP more likely to lean backward and fall forward. As there is no cure for the symptoms clinical studies tried anti-parkinsonian drugs to make wonders however there were no positive therapeutic effects.3

But certain studies states that muscle rigidity and occasional tremor may initially respond to levodopa. PSP and Parkinson’s both show stiffness, difficulties in movements, and lifetime impairments of motor functions so PSP is often misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease, but the fact is, PSP progresses more rapidly than Parkinson’s. As the condition progress, the symptoms become severe with patients experiencing chronic disability. The condition completely worsens in 5 years from the initial onset of warning signs.

Serious challenges include major fractures, pneumonia, head injury, and choking due to coughing. There is an increased chance of mortality caused due to pneumonia.

Good medical attention and nutrition are more crucial for these individuals to run their living.4

References:

  1. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy – Genetics Home Reference – NIH.” U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/progressive-supranuclear-palsy.
  2. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.” Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/7471/progressive-supranuclear-palsy.
  3. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Fact Sheet.” National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Fact-Sheets/Progressive-Supranuclear-Palsy-Fact-Sheet.
  4. Association, European Parkinson’s Disease. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP).” Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) | European Parkinson’s Disease Association, www.epda.eu.com/about-parkinsons/types/progressive-supranuclear-palsy-psp/.

Also Read:

Was this article helpful?

Yes No
×

Suggestions to Improve the Article

This article contains incorrect information.

This article does not have the information I am looking for.


I Have a Medical Question.

Ask A Doctor Now

If you are facing a medical emergency, call your local emergency services immediately, or visit the nearest ER or urgent care facility
×

Suggestions to Improve the Article

×

How Did This Article Help?

This Article Did Change My Life!


I Have a Medical Question.

Ask A Doctor Now

If you are facing a medical emergency, call your local emergency services immediately, or visit the nearest ER or urgent care facility
×

Thank you for your feedback.