Best Exercises/Activities/Yoga Poses For Paraganglioma

Exercises help maintain a healthy weight and reduce the risk of certain diseases, however when it comes to paraganglioma disorder, medical studies state that exercises induced nausea and vomiting.1

Clinical study concluded that nausea and vomiting were noticed as a symptom in pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma patients.2

Paraganglioma is an inherited condition characterized by the growth of a non-cancerous tumor, although not all yoga poses can bring in the best results meditation helps to manage blood pressure and heart palpitations.3, 4

Best Exercises/Activities For Paraganglioma

Exercises help maintain a healthy weight and reduce the risk of certain diseases, however when it comes to paraganglioma disorder, medical studies state that exercises induced nausea and vomiting. A medical study was conducted on nine patients who were in the middle-age experiencing symptoms of pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma.

Pheochromocytomas and paraganglioma is an inherited condition that comes from the same type of tissue of the sympathetic or parasympathetic ganglia. The condition is characterized by increased blood pressure, enhanced sweating, anxiety, and heart tremors.

These patients when exerting themselves with exercises and physical activities showed nausea and vomiting. This was confirmed by researchers and clinicians at the National Institute of Health. Clinical study concluded that nausea and vomiting were noticed as a symptom in pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma patients.1

Therefore, talk to your healthcare provider before changing your activity level. Changing the activity may induce serious side effects. When you are experiencing discomfort or noticeable symptoms, you should seek immediate medical attention either with a physical therapist or exercise specialist. They can develop a perfect activity program for you that can ease your recovery and not produce set-back to your health.

How To Start An Exercise Program After A Paraganglioma Tumor?

Exercise can be started at a small level like going for short and simple walks such as walking a dog or walking back and forth to the mailbox.

These activities can be for a 5-10-minute interval at least twice or thrice a week. However, exercises are not recommended when you are feeling dizzy, experiencing nausea or vomiting.2

Yoga Poses For Paraganglioma

Therapeutic activities like yoga can complement to paraganglioma tumor treatment in addition to clinical therapies. They can help heal the body, mind, and spirit to stay positive and to fight the cancer battle. Several studies have revealed the potential benefits of yoga in improving depression, anxiety level, stress, and improved quality of life. Certain yoga poses like

Seated Spinal Twist – This can cleanse organs and improve circulation and bring benefits to the circulatory system and internal organs

Legs Up The Wall – This is a restorative yoga procedure for relaxing your body and relieving stress that arises due to paraganglioma tumors.

Reclined Bound Angle – This can enhance the circulation of vital organs and improve the flexibility of the muscles.

Meditation – Paraganglioma is an inherited condition characterized by the growth of the non-cancerous tumor, although not all yoga poses can bring in the best results, yet meditation helps to manage blood pressure and heart palpitations.3, 4

Paraganglioma is an extra-adrenal tumor that arises in the head and neck of the parasympathetic nerve. They are non-cancerous slow-growing tumors that can result in life-threatening damage when left untreated. Surgery will not respond when the condition has progressed to the most advanced level.

There is no known cure for metastatic paraganglioma however existing therapies and medications can reduce tumors and extend the survival time. Exercises strengthen your body and lower the risk of high blood pressure and heart palpitations.

References:

  1. King, Kathryn S, et al. “Exercise-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: Another Sign and Symptom of Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma.”
  2. Endocrine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4130359/.
  3. Martins, Rute, and Maria João Bugalho. “Paragangliomas/Pheochromocytomas: Clinically Oriented Genetic Testing.” International Journal of Endocrinology, Hindawi, 12 May 2014, www.hindawi.com/journals/ije/2014/794187/.
  4. Rao, Raghavendra Mohan, et al. “Role of Yoga in Cancer Patients: Expectations, Benefits, and Risks: A Review.” Indian Journal of Palliative Care, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5545945/.
  5. “Yoga for Anxiety.” Yoga Journal, 3 Apr. 2017, www.yogajournal.com/poses/yoga-by-benefit/anxiety.

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