How Long Is Measles Vaccine Effective?

About Measles

Measles is an extremely contagious viral infection seen mostly in children, although adults at times can also get it. The virus causing Measles is transmitted by coming in physical contact with an infected individual, or coming in contact with droplets of mucous of the infected person when he or she coughs or sneezes.

There has been a spurt in the cases of measles in the United States since 2011 due to increased foreign travels especially to third world countries in Central Africa or Asia. This has prompted the FDA to issue a travel advisory for foreign travelers to get immunized with MMR vaccina before their scheduled travel to protect them from Measles.

The FDA has also issued an advisory to people born after 1957, college students, and healthcare professionals to get immunized with MMR vaccine to protect them from getting measles. This article gives an overview as to how long the effectiveness of measles vaccine lasts.

How Long Is Measles Vaccine Effective?

How Long Is Measles Vaccine Effective?

The measles vaccine is given in two series with the first series being given when the child is about 2 years of age. The second series is given when the child is about 4 years of age. These two vaccinations protect 99% of children from measles.

The effectives of the vaccine last for as long as 20-25 years. Thus it is recommended that individuals above the age of 30 get a blood work done to check for their immunization status against measles, especially if they travel to foreign countries frequently. If they are found to be not immunized then they need to get updated vaccination to protect them from getting measles while they are abroad.

In conclusion, the effectiveness of the measles vaccine last for a period of approximately 20-25 years. Thus it is highly recommended for frequent travelers who are above the age of 30 to get checked for immunization status against measles and if required get an updated shot to protect them, when they are abroad, from contracting Measles.

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