What Leads To Progressive Supranuclear Palsy & Can It Be Cured?

There is currently no known cause for this condition, but medical studies demonstrate that it is a form of tauopathy.1

Accumulation of tau protein results in the deterioration of neuron cells in the brain that can cause problems with balance, movement, vision, speech, and swallowing.2

There is no way to stop or slow symptoms of progressive supranuclear palsy, but current medical modalities aim to ease the symptoms.3,4

As we age, there is a great advancement in the medical field. Entering into the modern age has a plethora of new inventions however risk for certain health issues is equally increasing. Every person gets affected by the disease during some point of their lifetime.

Progressive supranuclear palsy is one of the rare neurogenerative neurological disease majorly affecting men who are 60 and above. It results in progressive impairment in balance, controlling your eyes, and making it difficult to see things.

What Leads To Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

There is currently no known cause for progressive supranuclear palsy, but medical studies demonstrate that it is a form of tauopathy. Tauopathies are a diverse group of sporadic brain disorders illustrated by irregular metabolism of misfolded τ (tau) proteins into neurofibrillary or gliofibrillary tangles. The destruction of vital filaments sometimes results in death. Accumulation of tau protein results in the deterioration of neuron cells in the brain that can cause problems with balance, movement, vision, speech, and swallowing.

Certain theories demonstrate that the condition is caused due to hereditary. There is evidence that supports cases that showed an increased association of genetic and environmental factors for the development of progressive supranuclear palsy.1

In medical terminology, the phrase tauopathies refer to brain disorders including PSP during which the mutation of MPAT protein is mishandled, which then delivers defective instructions for making tau to the nerve cell. There are very rare cases of PSP during which genetics have known to be the causing factor of the condition. Genetic elements have not been involved in most people.

Medical hypotheses suggest that when the individual is exposed to the unknown chemical in the food, air, or water, they may be affected with brain damage in certain cells of the brain. The cause is believed to be a dietary factor specific to their living areas.

Although experts understand how it happens there are exactly no reasons why it happens. Medical studies conclude the occurrence of PSP id due to brain stem damage, but it is not clear how this damage occurs. Similarly, the genetic cause of the disease is also not clear still.2

Can Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Be Cured?

There is no way to stop or slow symptoms of progressive supranuclear palsy, but current medical modalities aim to ease the symptoms and delay the progression of the disease.

PSP has similar symptoms as that of Parkinson’s so medications that were used in Parkinson’s were used in the treatment of progressive supranuclear palsy. These medicines were not effective however it provided temporary relief. Botox injection is used to relieve eye muscle problems and uncontrolled eyelid twitching. The vision deteriorates as the year progresses so wearing bifocal eyeglasses may help in looking downward. Speech and language therapist to help you learn safer swallowing procedures.

Early swallowing evaluation and regular assessment of swallowing function help you understand the progress of the progressive supranuclear palsy, and you can make use of the supportive measures. Physical exercises are your best buddy so physical therapy and occupational therapy can improve your balance.

Although this is not a curable condition yet increasing awareness about progressive supranuclear palsy and related brain diseases can help in early diagnosis with better results.3,4

References:

  1. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Fact Sheet.” National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Fact-Sheets/Progressive-Supranuclear-Palsy-Fact-Sheet.
  2. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.” Progressive Supranuclear Palsy | Johns Hopkins Medicine, www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/progressive-supranuclear-palsy.
  3. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 7 Feb. 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/progressive-supranuclear-palsy/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20355664.
  4. Cure PSP: Who We Are and What We Do, www.movementdisorders.org/MDS/News/Online-Web-Edition/Archived-Editions/Cure-PSP-Who-we-are-and-what-we-do.htm.

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