Is A Person With Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia At Risk For Kidney Failure?

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia abbreviated as BPH and Chronic Kidney Disease are some of the prominent but common problems seen in the elderly population. It is estimated that about 50% of all males with BPH experience some or the other type of symptoms. Any negligence in treatment or delay in diagnosis can result in potentially serious complications of which one is kidney failure.[1, 2, 3]

By definition, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) is defined as a condition characterized by prostate enlargement in the absence of any malignancy. Anatomically speaking, prostate is a gland located in between the bladder and the penis. The urethra that carries urine from the bladder to the penis passes through the prostate gland. The function of the prostate is to produce a white colored alkaline liquid that protects sperms during ejaculation.[1, 2, 3]

The prostate gland grows steadily since birth and becomes almost twice its size by puberty and even then continues to grow but slowly. There are some situations when the prostate gland becomes abnormally large to an extent that it starts putting pressure on the urethra and interferes with flow of urine.[1, 2, 3]

Kidney or renal failure on the other hand is a condition in which the kidneys do not function normally. Due to this, the body is not able to remove waste products from the blood. Some of the causes of renal failure include medical conditions like diabetes, autoimmune disorders, infections, hypertension and severe dehydration. Kidney failure has five stages and people with end stage or the final stage of kidney failure will require continued dialysis or even a kidney transplant.[1, 2, 3] The article below highlights whether Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) is a risk factor for kidney failure.

Is A Person With Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia At Risk For Kidney Failure?

As stated, the urethra which carries urine from the bladder to the penis passes through the middle of the prostate. In cases of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), the prostate gland becomes abnormally enlarged. This puts pressure on the urethra which obstructs or hampers the flow of urine. If urine is not able to pass through freely then it can at times result in kidney failure. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia often causes problems with urinating, decreased urinary stream, and inability to completely void.

There are also certain other conditions that can obstruct the flow of urine to include kidney stones, prostate cancer, and blood clots.[3]

Even though it is rare but BPH can actually cause kidney failure; however, damage to the kidneys can occur due to this disease. When kidney failure occurs due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia there will be additional symptoms to include nausea, chest pains, fatigue, lower extremity edema, problems breathing, decreased urinary output. If not treated then kidney failure due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia can cause potentially serious complications to include confusion, seizures, and even in some cases coma.[3]

How to Prevent Kidney Failure Due To Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia?

In order to prevent damage to the kidneys and eventual kidney failure, a person with BPH should adhere to the treatment recommendations as laid out by their physician. This will include a combination of lifestyle changes and medications. Sometimes surgery may also be done to treat Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. It is vital to understand that BPH should be detected and treated as early as possible. This immensely helps in improving the quality of life of the person and prevents Kidney Failure.[3]

For people at risk for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, it is necessary to get the prostate checked regularly to look for any changes indicative of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. If symptoms are reported promptly and the condition detected early, majority of the people with BPH will not go into kidney failure. With treatment the symptoms of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia improve significantly. In some cases, treatments will have to be given continuously to prevent the symptoms from getting worse.[3]

For people with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia who have kidney failure, the main focus of treatment is to slow down the progress. In cases of end stage kidney failure, continuous dialysis will be required and even kidney transplant depending on the age and health status of the person.[3]

In conclusion, although rare but Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia can cause a person to have kidney failure. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia is a condition in which the prostate gland enlarges abnormally. This puts pressure on the urethra and the flow of urine through it is hampered. This leads to various kidney problems. A person with kidney failure due to BPH will have certain additional symptoms of chest pains, problems breathing, and edema of the lower extremities.[1, 2, 3]

It is vital for people with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia to closely monitor their symptoms and report to the physician promptly to prevent any complications such as kidney failure to arise due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.[1, 2, 3]

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