Is There A Surgery For Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

A progressive supranuclear palsy can affect many areas of health and there is currently no cure for this condition but a lot of things can be done to help manage symptoms.1

Treatments are available to help ease the symptoms of the disorder and the options include medications, eyeglasses, speech therapy, and physical therapy.2, 3

A range of medications can help curb progressive supranuclear palsy and to help in controlling shakiness and tremors.4

Is There A Surgery For Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

A progressive supranuclear palsy can affect many areas of health and there is currently no cure for this condition but a lot of things can be done to help manage symptoms. Affected individuals often experience mental impairment and personality changes. PSP is most commonly noticed after 60 years of age and the report suggests that men are more affected than women.

There is currently no exact cause of the condition and often incorrectly diagnosed for Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and a few other degenerative disorders. The symptoms of progressive supranuclear palsy differ from person to person and the progression is often based on the preconditions of the individuals. Most patients of PSP develop abnormal symptoms rigidity and loss of voluntary function in the upper limb, shakiness, and tremor while writing or performing your routines and abnormalities of eye movement.1

Impaired eye movements can make your lives harder while driving your car and walking resulting in increased fractures. Some progressive supranuclear palsy patients may experience sleep disturbances and cognitive impairment. This may result in depression and abnormalities in sleep patterns. Treatments are available to help ease the symptoms of the disorder and the options include medications, eyeglasses, speech therapy, and physical therapy.

Progressive Bifocal Glasses- They resembles the same as single vision lenses but helps you see long distances in the absence of bifocal lines. However, some patients who have accustomed to bifocal encounter discomforts wearing progressive bifocal lenses. The features available in these lenses are adjustable.

Speech Therapy- Progressive supranuclear palsy individuals typically experience problems with speaking and converse their expressions, so speech therapy helps to avoid choking and swallowing difficulties. Speech and language therapists can help deal with your problems.

Physical Therapy- Exercises usually help for any kind of disease however it should be performed under medical supervision to avoid worsening your symptoms. Your healthcare provider may suggest physical therapy to help stiffen your muscles and to prevent frequent falls that often lead to a multitude of fractures.2, 3

Medications- A range of medications can help curb progressive supranuclear palsy and to help in controlling shakiness and tremors. Most PSP patients may benefit from using levodopa, amantadine, or some other drugs that are used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.

However, people with severe swallowing complications may need gastrostomy procedures. It is a surgical operation wherein an opening into the stomach from the abdominal wall is made to ease swallowing and for the betterment of eating who has trouble eating or drinking.4

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a rare progressive movement disorder that causes degenerative impairment of balance and walking, losing control of eye muscles, and abnormal muscle tone rigidity. The condition has overlapping symptoms resembling Parkinson’s disease.

Progressive supranuclear palsy majorly affects brain cells and affects many areas including the brainstem and eye impairment. Medical studies are still investigating the cause of the condition but it remains unknown. The condition is degenerative and worsens with an increase in age. Persons affected with this condition may lead a lifespan of three to seven years based on the progression of the condition.

References:

  1. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 7 Feb. 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/progressive-supranuclear-palsy/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20355664.
  2. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Fact Sheet.” National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/patient-caregiver-education/fact-sheets/progressive-supranuclear-palsy-fact-sheet.
  3. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy | PSP.” MedlinePlus, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 18 Dec. 2019, medlineplus.gov/progressivesupranuclearpalsy.html.
  4. Melinosky, Christopher. “Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Symptoms, Causes, Treatments.” WebMD, WebMD, 14 Nov. 2019, www.webmd.com/parkinsons-disease/progressive-supranuclear-palsy-psp#1.

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