High blood pressure became a common illness among millions of people across the globe. The long-term force exerted on the artery walls leads to high blood pressure and eventually results in heart ailments and heart attacks. Measuring the blood pressure is possible by calculating the amount of blood pumped by the heart and the resistance provided by the arteries, which help in the smooth flow of the blood. When the narrowness in the arteries increases, the heart pumps blood at an excessive rate in order to meet the demand raised by the body.

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Symptoms

It is possible for any individual to possess high blood pressure without any signs. According to specialists, one-third of the population displayed uptight attitude, one-third display a relaxed manner, and the remaining fall in between both the categories. The significant symptoms experienced by individuals suffering from high blood pressure include:

What Would Cause A Sudden High Blood Pressure?

The sudden development of high blood pressure (secondary hypertension) is because of an underlying condition. When there is an increase in the symptoms of the underlying disease, the individual will experience a sudden surge in the blood pressure. Identifying the signs and making changes to the lifestyle will be helpful in preventing the occurrence at any time.

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The following is the list of risk factors that may develop a sudden high blood pressure:

  • Age
  • Race
  • Family history
  • Overweight or suffering from obesity
  • Physically inactive
  • Use of tobacco products
  • Excessive use of salt, especially sodium
  • Reduced intake of potassium in the diet
  • Reduced intake of vitamin D in the diet
  • Excessive abuse of alcohol
  • Stress
  • Chronic conditions.

Although high blood pressure is noticeable among adults, occurring among children is becoming common in the present generation. The reason is due to the problems developed because of heart or kidneys. However, the primary and significant impact is poor lifestyle habits. It includes unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, and obesity.

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It is also crucial to know that there are two types of blood pressures - primary hypertension and secondary hypertension.

Primary Hypertension - in many of the circumstances, it is not possible to identify the presence of high blood pressure in adults. Primary hypertension develops gradually over a period, which makes it difficult to recognize it in its early stage.

Secondary Hypertension - the occurrence of secondary hypertension is due to an underlying condition. These underlying conditions are responsible for the sudden appearance of high blood pressure. Several medications and circumstances lead to secondary hypertension that includes:

  • Kidney problems
  • Thyroid problems
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Adrenal gland tumors
  • Congenital disabilities in blood vessels

Use of excessive medicines such as decongestants, birth control pills, cold remedies, pain relievers, and a few prescription drugs

Complications

The excessive pressure exerted on the artery walls due to a sudden high blood pressure causes severe damage to the organs as well as blood vessels. The increased blood pressure for an extended period increases the damage it causes to the body. Uncontrolled high blood pressure leads to:

  • Heart attack
  • Aneurysms
  • Heart failure
  • Narrowed and weakened blood vessels in the kidney
  • Narrowed or torn blood vessels in the eyes
  • Development of metabolic syndrome
  • The trouble with understanding and memory loss.

Consulting a Doctor

It is preferable to consult a doctor and note down the blood pressure reading starting from the age of 18 for every two years. For individuals reaching 40 and above, measuring high blood pressure yearly is preferable. The doctor will recommend frequent readings upon identifying the presence of high blood pressure or find the risk factors that lead to the development of cardiovascular diseases.

Also Read:

Pramod Kerkar

Written, Edited or Reviewed By:

, MD,FFARCSI

Pain Assist Inc.

Last Modified On: March 26, 2018

This article does not provide medical advice. See disclaimer

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