Do You Need To Take Antibiotics For Laryngitis?

Laryngitis is an inflammation or infection of the larynx and vocal cords. Laryngitis causes the vocal cords to swell, changing the way they vibrate and the sound of the voice.
The larynx is the upper part of the trachea, adapted to the needs of phonation or voice emission. It is the organ of phonation because it contains the upper vocal cords. In addition, it communicates to the pharynx with the trachea and is in front of it.

Do You Need To Take Antibiotics For Laryngitis?

Do You Need To Take Antibiotics For Laryngitis?

Acute laryngitis caused by a virus often improves on its own in about a week, since the body’s immune system can usually take care of the infection itself. There are some simple and effective ways for the patient to relieve symptoms, such as taking pain and fever medications.

Some other methods of personal care and home treatments can alleviate the symptoms of laryngitis and reduce the tension in your voice:

-Breathe moist air: Use a humidifier to keep the whole house or office humid. Inhale steam from a hot water container or a hot shower. Inhale the steam, which can help relieve the stuffy nose.

-Rest your voice as much as possible: Avoid talking or singing too loudly or too long. If you need to speak to large groups, try using a microphone or a megaphone. Avoid talking when possible.

-Stay hydrated: Drink lots of water and liquids (without alcohol). It is a key to prevent dehydration. Alcohol and caffeine are completely forbidden.

-Moisten the throat: Try sucking pills to suck, gargle with salt water or chew gum.

-Avoid decongestants: These medications can dry the throat.

-Medicines: Acetaminophen, ibuprofen and aspirin can help control the symptoms of laryngitis, such as headache, sore throat and fever.

-The patient should avoid tobacco: But also exposure to cigarette smoke.

It Can Help Soothe A Sore Throat By:

-Gargle with warm salt water.

-Sucking an ice cube or a throat pill.

-Drink hot water with honey and lemon, which can also be a simple and effective home remedy.

Consult your doctor if your symptoms get worse, or if your symptoms do not improve after 10 days.

Medical Treatment for Laryngitis

The treatments of chronic laryngitis are aimed at treating the underlying causes, such as heartburn, smoking, excessive consumption of alcohol. The used medications in some cases include:

Antibiotics: In almost all cases of laryngitis, an antibiotic will not help because the cause is viral. But if you have a bacterial infection – a rare cause of laryngitis – the doctor may recommend an antibiotic. You can get laryngitis when you have a cold or flu (influenza). These infections are caused by viruses, so antibiotics do not help. Antibiotics do not kill viruses; these medicines are designed to kill bacteria. Using antibiotics when you do not need them can contribute to the problem of antibiotic resistance. Results from clinical studies have shown that antibiotics do not improve the symptoms of laryngitis. Taking antibiotics can also cause side effects such as diarrhea.

Corticosteroids: Sometimes, corticosteroids can help to reduce inflammation of the vocal cords. However, this treatment is used only when there is an urgent need for treatment of laryngitis – for example, when you need to use your voice to sing or give a speech or oral presentation, or in some cases when a child has laryngitis associated with croup. For patients with significant laryngitis, a short course of steroids (prednisone, prednisolone, dexamethasone) can be used to decrease inflammation and shorten the course of symptoms. This treatment option is often considered to actors, singers, or other affected people who have to make a presentation using their voice.

Conclusion

In most cases, laryngitis cause is viral, so the symptoms will get better in a few days. The doctor is who determines if the clinical presentation suggests a bacterial infection, only in those counted cases the patient would need to take antibiotics in order to treat the underlying cause.

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