What is Baby Botox & How Does it Work? | Side Effects of Baby Botox

What is Baby Botox?

Baby Botox is injecting small doses of Botox injections. It is similar to traditional Botox, the difference being that baby Botox is injected in smaller amounts.

The aim of Baby Botox is to add volume to the face and smoothen out wrinkles. It makes the face look smoother and younger without any plastic expression, which can sometimes result from traditional Botox.

A person with healthy skin, no prior reaction to botulism toxin, having controlled blood pressure level, and not suffering from hepatitis or any bleeding condition is an ideal candidate for this procedure.

How Does Baby Botox Work?

How Does Baby Botox Work?

Baby Botox when compared with traditional Botox, gives a more natural-looking result.

Botox is made from botulinum toxin type A, which blocks the nerve signals that tell the muscles to contract.

As the toxin is inserted, the muscle gets paralyzed until the effect of toxin wears off. This minimizes the appearance of wrinkles as the muscles are not triggering the formation of creases caused by movement.

Botox makes the face appear fuller just like the lips.

Giving baby Botox means giving smaller doses making the result less dramatic. This makes it less noticeable and the face may be more flexible and less frozen.

How is Baby Botox Given?

Before going ahead with the procedure the cosmetologist gives a brief about the procedure and the expected results.

They inform the person undergoing the procedure, how much Botox will be injected and how long the result would last.

It is possible to adjust the amount of Botox, but not possible to remove once the Botox is injected.

The procedure is done in the following steps.

  • Any type of makeup is removed before the doctor begins the procedure.
  • The face is then sterilized with an alcohol swab. A mild anesthesia is applied to the injection site to minimize pain.
  • Botox is injected in the concerned place. The process takes only a couple of minutes.

Once the procedure is done, you can go ahead with your other appointments for the day.

How To Prepare For Baby Botox?

An individual going ahead with the procedure is advised to stop taking blood-thinning medications, 2 weeks prior to the injection.

He is updated about the associated risks. It is essential for you to update the doctor on any kind of allergies or medication you are currently taking.

Avoid alcohol consumption 2 days before the procedure.

Where is Baby Botox Performed?

Baby Botox is given on the areas of the face where there is an appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. The targeted areas include:

  • Lips
  • Frown lines
  • Lip fillers
  • Forehead wrinkles
  • Crow’s feet
  • Neck and jawbone
  • Brow furrows

Results of Baby Botox

A few days after the Botox avoid massaging or rubbing the face. Also, avoid strenuous exercises to avoid redistribution of Botox cosmetic.

Due to the botulinum toxins, the muscles get paralyzed after the procedure.

The results take a week to show up.

The results of Baby Botox are not permanent and last for around 2-3 months. Those wanting to continue can take an appointment to get more injections.

Side Effects of Baby Botox

Baby Botox is a low-risk procedure. But, just like any other cosmetic procedure, there can be a risk of undesirable side effects.(1)

Common Side Effects Include:

  • Swelling at the site of injection
  • Bruising at the injection site
  • Muscle weakness
  • Headache or flu-like symptoms
  • Dry mouth
  • Drooping of eyebrows
  • An asymmetrical result

Rare Side Effects Include:

It is important to visit a trained and experienced plastic surgeon to reduce the chances of side effects.

How is Baby Botox Different From Traditional Botox?

In Baby Botox, fewer cosmetics are used making it less expensive. The results are subtle and low maintenance.

It does not last as long as traditional Botox.

Some people might find the result to be too subtle and wanting to get more noticeable would go ahead with the traditional Botox treatment.

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