What Is The Prognosis For PAPVR & Lifestyle Changes For It?

When both of the pulmonary veins are affected, it may result in shortness of breath during strenuous work or heavy exercises.1,2

The facts for the significance of lifestyle changes is overwhelming and help us lead a more sustainable life.3

Lifestyle changes can help manage symptoms slow down the progression of the disease and enhance the health of your heart4.

What Is The Prognosis For PAPVR?

PAPVR is a serious congenital cardiovascular condition and when left untreated results in mortality in children. Medical studies demonstrate that children who weren’t treated for PAPVR do not survive the first year of life. When both of the pulmonary veins are affected, it may result in shortness of breath during strenuous work or heavy exercises.

The treatment consists of heart surgery to repair the function and re-route all the pulmonary venous return to the left atrium. Also, the atrial septal defect is covered with a patch. However, if you aren’t experiencing any symptoms or there isn’t any mix of oxygen-rich red blood and oxygen-poor blue blood, surgery is not required.

Although Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return is not chronic nor life-threatening unlike Total anomalous pulmonary venous return, early diagnosis, and treatment are crucial. The age at which the surgery is done depends on the severity of the condition of the child. The long-term outcome of surgical repair of partial anomalous pulmonary venous return is excellent and clinical studies have proven evidence on that.1,2

Lifestyle Changes For PAPVR

Coping with open heart surgery for PAPVR and ASD repair is critical. The facts for the significance of lifestyle changes is overwhelming and help us lead a more sustainable life. Although no treatment and monitoring is required for mild cases, diet and life changes along with medication can help improve conditions and ease recovery.3

When you have congenital heart problems, lifestyle changes can help manage symptoms slow down the progression of the disease, and enhance the health of your heart.

Quit Smoking: Smoking, in general, is injurious to health, especially when you have cardiovascular problems it can cause your blood vessels to twitch. This eventually lowers the oxygen level in the blood and as a result of which you can experience reduced functionalities of your organs. There are several ways to quit smoking, you can talk with your doctor, discuss with your friends, family members or someone who can help to come out of this problem.

Regular Exercise: Although too many exercises can cause shortness of breath, simple exercises can let blood flow into the tissues you need and help reduce symptoms. However, make sure you do not perform exercises without consulting your doctor because your doctor will know your history and suggest exercises accordingly.

Maintain A Healthy Weight: Excess weight is a great risk to several diseases. It can help manage your health problems, control sugar levels, maintain normal blood pressure, and especially manage depression. Weight loss is not easy however there are a variety of methods through which you can make positive changes to lose weight.4

Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) encompasses a specific group of rare congenital heart diseases that are developed due to the incorrect draining of the blood by one or more of the pulmonary veins. Most congenital heart diseases are frequently associated with ASD (Atrial Septal Defect). The symptoms of PAPVR is often dependent on the degree of left to right shunting.

References:

  1. Sears, Edmund H, et al. “Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Return Presenting with Adult-Onset Pulmonary Hypertension.” Pulmonary Circulation, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3401879/.
  2. “Congenital Heart Disease in Adults.” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 14 May 2020, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/partial-anomalous-pulmonary-venous-return/cdc-20385691.
  3. “Lifestyle Changes to Manage Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD).” Winchester Hospital, www.winchesterhospital.org/health-library/article?id=20008.
  4. Ambrosino, Nicolino, and Enrica Bertella. “Lifestyle Interventions in Prevention and Comprehensive Management of COPD.” Breathe (Sheffield, England), European Respiratory Society, Sept. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6118879/.

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